KGOU

News

Caroline Halter/KGOU

In the first of three interviews with each of Oklahoma's gubernatorial candidates, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley speak with Libertarian Chris Powell. Powell explains his party's philosophy and lays out his positions on key issues like taxes, recreational marijuana, healthcare, abortion and education policy. 

FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Caroline Halter/KGOU

Speaking at an event in Oklahoma City on Oct 8, Stephanie Hudson held a piece of paper that read “#DefendICWA.” ICWA is the Indian Child Welfare Act, and Hudson, who runs Oklahoma Indian Legal Services, warned about a recent court decision in Texas calling the law “race-based” and therefore unconstitutional.

 

A gavel is shown in a courtroom in the Cleveland County Courthouse.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

George Gibbs is no stranger to District Judge Linda Morrissey’s courtroom.

Sarah Adams-Cornell holds the Mayor's proclamation that declares October 8 Indigenous Peoples Day in Oklahoma City.
Caroline Halter / KGOU

Sarah Adams-Cornell, a member of Choctaw Nation, is one many activists who has worked for over three years to get Indigenous Peoples' Day officially recognized in Oklahoma City.

“It helps to solidify our sovereignty as indigenous people,” Adams-Cornell said. She’s part of a group called Live Indigenous OK.

Zheng Qu / Gaylord News

As the Trump administration rolls out federal aid for the agriculture industry caught in an escalating international trade war, Oklahoma farmers are waiting for a permanent solution to an uncertain future.  

Tariffs like those from China, imposed in July 2018 on $50 billion worth of U.S. exports, are hitting several sectors of Oklahoma’s agricultural industry. Those tariffs are in retaliation to the Trump administration’s tariffs on billions worth of Chinese industrial goods this summer.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor speaks with political scientist Dr. Keith Gaddie of the University of Oklahoma. The two dissect campaign activity leading up to the general election on Nov 6, including negative ads, push polls and the influx of dark money.

Angie White said while she’s afraid her brother will go to jail, she will feel some relief if she knows where he is.
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Addiction is a bitter enemy that has haunted Angie White’s family for decades. White has watched her 49-year-old brother struggle with drug abuse most of his life.

Golfers on the 18th fairway at Trosper Golf Club in Oklahoma City Wednesday.
Mark Hancock / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s sweeping alcohol law changes went into effect Monday. Grocery and convenience stores can now sell cold full strength beer and wine, and liquor stores can stay open later and sell non-alcoholic products like limes and corkscrews.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Federal lawmakers failed to pass a new farm bill by the September 30 deadline. Though key programs like crop insurance won’t be affected, funding for others will stop at the end of the year.

 

 

“Some of these other smaller programs are vitally important to farmers,” noted Jimmy Kinder, a wheat and cattle farmer in Walters, Oklahoma. “You need to have a healthy research pipeline to make sure that you stay current.”

Caroline Halter / KGOU

John Carpenter is a yoga instructor in Choctaw. He previously worked as a probation officer, and before that he owned a construction company. And Carpenter recently organized his community’s opposition to the Eastern Oklahoma County Turnpike.

Pre-kindergarten teaching assistant Rose Mashinda talks to students in a French class at Le Monde International School, a public charter school in Norman.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Students as young as 4 spend the day at Le Monde International School learning to speak, write and read in French or Spanish. On a recent day, a class of boys and girls greeted their principal with an enthusiastic “Bonjour!” Another class crafted Eiffel Towers out of craft sticks.

Woman on her claim in 1889.
Oklahoma Historical Society

A Kansas reporter wrote in 1893 he had discovered an all-female town in Oklahoma. But when he tried to go back to the village one week later, it was gone. 

 

KGOU listener Bart Varner asked How Curious: What happened? 

Cherokee Nation

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley speak with Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. of the Cherokee Nation. Hoskin discusses Cherokee Nation’s investments in health and education, the tribe’s perspective on renegotiating gaming compacts, and more.

FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Marijuana leaf
Wikimedia Commons

Oklahomans voted in 2016 to reduce penalties for drug possession and this year approved a state question welcoming medical marijuana into the state. Officials in two cities recently reacted to those decisions. 

Oklahoma City, the state’s largest municipality, has chosen to reduce fines and eliminate jail terms for marijuana possession. 

Local Democratic organizer Terry Gresham talks with House District 62 candidate Larry Bush at the Comanche County Democratic Party office in Lawton on September 21, 2018.
Caroline Halter / KGOU

Mike Couke runs the Comanche County Democratic Party out of a one-room office nestled between a laundromat and a barbershop in Lawton. This year, he’s focused on training local Democrats to make better use of voter lists ahead of the general election. 

Gubernatorial candidates Kevin Stitt and Drew Edmondson are shown at an Aug. 24 forum in Oklahoma City sponsored by the Oklahoma State School Boards Association.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

With just over six weeks until Election Day, Republican Kevin Stitt and Democrat Drew Edmondson shared the stage Monday for the first gubernatorial debate with the two major-party candidates.

Students work on computers in a John Rex Charter Middle School classroom at the Myriad Gardens complex in Oklahoma City.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma is moving closer to changing the way it funds schools after a yearlong look at the education funding formula by a group of lawmakers and educators.

Christine Pappas is a professor and department chair of the Department of Political Science at East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma.
Caroline Halter / KGOU

The chair of the political science department at East Central University in Ada challenges her students to enroll their peer to vote.

“Instead of me an old person or some other professor asking a student to register if they're asked by a friend or a classmate they're much more likely to register,” Christine Pappas told KGOU’s Capitol Insider.

Koln Knight is the superintendent of Cushing Public Schools.
Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma education leaders say a state question designed to give districts more spending flexibility will do little to improve public schools’ financial difficulties.

Oklahoma Cherokee Veterans Visit DC

Sep 20, 2018
The group of  veterans on the 2018 Warrior Flight stop to take a group photo in front of The Three Servicemen statue at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
Megan Ross / Gaylord News

Placing a hand against the smooth, black granite for balance, 92-year-old John Cockrum stood on his toes and reached with his folded umbrella to point at a name high on the wall of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Pages