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AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss the results of the August 28 primary runoff. More incumbents were defeated, but looking at non-legislative races complicates the picture. Plus, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Drew Edmondson ramps up his campaign for the general election, hoping to sway Republicans who voted for Mick Cornett in the primary runoff.

 

FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Dr. William Yarborough, right, speaks with patient Richard Potts at the Oklahoma Pain and Wellness Center in Tulsa.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

William Yarborough walks across the hall from his office to an exam room. His Hawaiian shirt and matching khaki pants aren’t the typical doctor’s garb.

Two women ride Bird electric scooters past a Spokies bike-share station near Reno Avenue and Ron Norick Boulevard in Oklahoma City Friday.
Jay Chilton / Journal Record

Commuters in several cities in Oklahoma have new options for getting around town. Bicycle and electric scooter sharing programs are popping up in Oklahoma City, Tulsa, Norman and Stillwater. Some, like Oklahoma City’s Spokies, are public programs. Others, like Bird, are private companies.

A deep-pocketed political newcomer and Republican businessman from Tulsa will face a longtime Democratic Party stalwart and former attorney general in November’s gubernatorial election.

Matt Pinnell, left, and Kevin Stitt talk to reporters at a watch party in Tulsa on Aug. 28, 2018.
Matt Trotter / Oklahoma Engaged

A political outsider will be the Republican party's nominee for governor.

Kevin Stitt, a Tulsa businessman, defeated former Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett in Tuesday's Republican primary runoff. Stitt defeated Cornett 55 to 45 percent. 

Rep. Bobby Cleveland, left, and Sherrie Conley, right.
Oklahoma House of Representatives / Provided

Tuesday is Oklahoma’s primary runoff election and in House District 20, an educator is campaigning to oust Republican incumbent Bobby Cleveland, who’s held the seat for six years.

Students enter Lexington Elementary School on April 13 after the school was closed for nine school days during the teacher walkout.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

The latest counts of emergency certified teachers in Oklahoma capture a stubborn reality: Classrooms across the state are being staffed by a teacher who isn’t fully trained or prepared.

"I Voted" stickers are seen at Oklahoma County Election Commission offices.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

If there is one thing clear about Tuesday’s primary runoff election, it’s that voters and observers are in for a record level of suspense.

Edmond resident Jay Mandraccia casts her primary ballot during early voting Thursday at the Oklahoma County Board of Elections. Regular voting will be held Tuesday.
Trevor Brown / Oklahoma Watch

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss the high number of runoff races on Tuesday’s ballot, including the race between Republican gubernatorial candidates Kevin Stitt and Mick Cornett. 

Kevin Stitt, candidate for the Republican nomination for Oklahoma Governor, speaks in Guthrie, Okla., Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.
Sue Ogrocki / AP Photo

Newly obtained documents from Wisconsin regulators show gubernatorial candidate Kevin Stitt personally signed background-check documents for Gateway Mortgage Group in 2008 that did not disclose previous regulatory actions against his company in three other states.

Kelvin Droegemeier responds to questions from senators during the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on August 23.
Megan Ross / Gaylord News

Calling himself a scientist, stormchaser and educator, former OU vice president Kelvin Droegemeier adamantly defended freedom of scientific inquiry from political influence while facing questions on climate change from a Senate panel during a Thursday nomination hearing for a White House position.

Sam Anderson, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, describes his debut book as "a love letter to Oklahoma City, which is the most secretly interesting place in America."

 

A temporary water line placed by an oil company in Custer County.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma Oil and Gas Association on Tuesday sued Kingfisher County Commissioners, the latest salvo in a long-simmering fight over water use in one of the state’s most prolific oil fields.

Kelly Vierling said her family found out quickly it was their responsibility to figure out what would happen next during the prosecution of her son’s killer.
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Kelly Vierling said her son had a “huge heart.”

Vierling’s eyes water as she described her 21-year-old son Alex in her office on the Oklahoma State University campus. 

Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Oklahoma’s State Board of Education is set to approve a record-breaking number of emergency teaching certifications at its meeting Thursday, a strong indication a statewide teacher shortage is still growing.

Wikimedia Commons

The Archdiocese of Oklahoma City is investigating one of its former priests accused of sexual abuse in the 1980s. The organization made the announcement on August 22, after receiving a letter from a former Oklahoma City resident a few days earlier.

Paul N. "Red" Adair is seen in a November, 1980 photo, appearing on ABC's "Good Morning America" show.
Ap Photo

The potential for an explosion exists every time an oil and gas well is drilled. A specialized group of oil field workers, sometimes called ‘hellfighters,’ respond to and control well explosions, like the one in Quinton, Oklahoma in January. The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports it’s a job that requires a high degree of training, but some professionals are concerned about loss of experience in the field.

State Rep. Todd Russ, R-Cordell, (left) is facing Democratic challenger Dennis Dugger this November.
Todd Russ Facebook // Jacob McCleland/KGOU

Emily Tuck walks through the backroom aisles at Carrol’s Shoe Corner in Elk City. She works here and at a record store next door in this city’s bustling downtown district of coffee shops, clothing boutiques and gift stores.

Caroline Halter/KGOU

The tiny southern Oklahoma town of Achille made national headlines last week when schools closed after adults made threatening comments online about a 12-year-old transgender student named Maddie. Now Maddie is receiving financial support from people across the world, thanks to social media.

 

 

Students at John Rex Charter Middle School in Oklahoma City – sixth graders Finley Cunningham, top left, Direon Kelley, bottom left, Charlie Marshall and Taylor Ellis – sit on cushions in the hallway during a break from schoolwork.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

There are 75 middle-school students in the long, sunlit room, sitting four to a table.

They work quietly and independently on laptops, most wearing headphones. Some fidget, their chairs rocking with them.

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