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Oklahoma’s adoption of medical marijuana will be green in more ways than one: Retail dispensaries, processors, growing operations and tax agencies will have to work within a cash-only industry.

Robert Dauffenback

Oklahoma’s economy is tracks closely with the price of oil, which have risen significantly since the 2014 downturn. In this episode of Capitol Insider, Bob Dauffenbach, the Senior Associate Dean for Economic Development and Impact at the University of Oklahoma, joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss the state’s economic outlook. Dauffenbach also offers his thoughts on what policymakers should be doing to harness the state's economic growth.

 

 FULL TRANSCRIPT:

A warning sign near Davis Correctional Facility in Holdenville.
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Runaway inmates from low security areas is common, but the number leaving a prison in Taft is shocking residents.

Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oil and gas companies spent more than half a million dollars to defeat State Question 788, a statewide ballot initiative to legalize medical marijuana in Oklahoma.

Companies from Oklahoma, Colorado and Texas collectively contributed $590,100 to “SQ 788 is Not Medical,” a political action committee established to defeat the measure, state ethics records show.

Darren D. Heusel/Tinker Airforce Base/

State Auditor Gary Jones released a special audit of the Dept of Veterans affairs Wednesday. The report details “a culture of fear and intimidation” stemming from the agency’s top management that ultimately worsens care for veterans.

A student-led tour group walks on the south oval of the University of Oklahoma campus.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

For decades, the University of Oklahoma has been recruiting and heavily investing in National Merit Scholars — academically advanced students who score in the top 1 percent on a standardized test.

Under State Question 788, medical marijuana patients will be able to grow a small number of marijuana plants at their home.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

The nine-member Oklahoma State Board of Health unanimously passed new medical marijuana emergency regulations at a special meeting Wednesday.

The new emergency rules, which were updated just a few hours before the vote, are less than a third of the length of the regulations approved at the board’s July 10 meeting.

The Oklahoma Judicial Center houses the state Supreme Court, the Court of Criminal Appeals and the Administrative Office of the Courts.
Trevor Brown / Oklahoma Watch

In a lawsuit filed against Gov. Mary Fallin and other state officials, the Oklahoma Ethics Commission alleges that its appropriation for the current fiscal year is insufficient and therefore violates the state constitution.

Owner Sylvia Wilson, center, sits with a customer and an employee at Boots Cafe in Taft, Oklahoma.
Quinton Chandler / Oklahoma Engaged

If you follow your nose to the back of Boots Cafe, you’ll run into swinging wood doors hanging underneath a metal script sign of the word ‘Blessed.’

Aerial view of the Wind Catcher site in Oklahoma’s Panhandle.
AEP

American Electric Power on Friday canceled construction of the largest U.S. wind farm in the Oklahoma Panhandle after utility regulators in Texas rejected the project.

The medical marijuana information table at the Oklahoma State Department of Health.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

The Oklahoma State Department of Health on Friday released a new draft of medical marijuana regulations.

The most significant changes to the current rules would bring the state’s medical marijuana regulations more in line with the language that voters approved in State Question 788.

Sue Ogrocki/AP

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss ongoing meetings about Oklahoma’s medical marijuana rules. They also give an update on the Oklahoma Ethics Commission’s lawsuit against Gov. Mary Fallin and other state officials ahead of its July 31 hearing in the state Supreme Court.

FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Dick Pryor: Shawn, the Oklahoma summer of marijuana continues with more developments in the regulation of medicinal marijuana.

 

Marijuana leaf
Wikimedia Commons

For Oklahoma inmates, the state’s legalization of medical marijuana will not translate into access in the state prison system.

Doctors in Oklahoma are barred from recommending medical marijuana to women of “childbearing years” without first conducting a pregnancy test. Since licenses last two years, women will have to take — and likely pay for — pregnancy tests multiple times.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

Avery Huckabee is looking over the menu at the Earth Cafe in Norman with her friends. With the passage of State Question 788 in June, which legalized medical marijuana in Oklahoma, the high school senior is looking forward to talking to her doctor about getting a license.

Master teacher Carolyn Wood applies glue to an art project with student Brendan Compton, 4, at Children’s Discovery Center in Norman on July 24. The childcare facility, which takes children up to 5 years old, is currently full with a waitlist of families.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

The unexpected closure of a well-regarded, highly rated child care center in Oklahoma City has put parents in an all-too-familiar, tough spot: scrambling to find places for their children amid a drop in the number of daycares.

Matthias Zomer/Pexels

The Trump administration announced yesterday  $12 billion dollars in relief funding for farmers harmed by tariffs imposed by China, the EU, Mexico, and Canada in response to those levied by the United States. The USDA says the relief will come through subsidies, surplus purchases and the development of new export markets.

Roy Lindsey of the Oklahoma Pork Council expects the funding to become available in September and says it’s a sign that the president is following through on his promises.

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

After weeks of headlines dominated by White House actions on the international stage, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will face questions from lawmakers Wednesday afternoon about how the Trump administration is managing foreign policy.

Live streaming video will begin as the proceedings begin, at approximately 3:00 p.m. ET. Refresh this page if video doesn't play.

Former Talihina Veterans Center Director Roy Griffith, left, shakes hands with Choctaw Nation Chief Gary Batton at a fall 2017 open house of the veterans nursing home. Former Mayor Don Faulkner watches at right.
Talihina Chamber of Commerce

The Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs put out a request for proposals last month for site selection for a new Talihina Veterans Center in southeastern Oklahoma. The veterans nursing home came under scrutiny following the deaths of two veterans. The new center can be located within 90  miles or 2 hours of Talihina. The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports residents of Talihina are fighting to keep the facility in their small town.

Martha Buehring, a 71-year-old Republican and former military wife, is one of many older Oklahomans who are frustrated with the state budget.
Caroline Halter / Oklahoma Engaged

People over 65 are the most likely to vote. They’re also the group that’s most likely to point to government issues — like mismanaged taxpayer money — as their biggest political concern, according to a poll commissioned by Oklahoma public radio stations.

AP/Sue Ogrocki

This fall, the 25,000 students attending Moore Public Schools will get new identification badges that grant access to school buildings. The new security measure was made possible by $420,000 in private donations, according to Clayton Ramick, Executive Director of the Moore School’s Foundation.

“After Parkland it just clicked with this community that we needed to step up,” Ramick said.

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