KGOU

Jacob McCleland

KGOU News Director

Jacob joined the KGOU News department in March 2015; previously he spent nine years as a reporter and host at public radio station KRCU in Cape Girardeau, Mo. His stories have appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, Here & Now, Harvest Public Media and PRI’s The World. Jacob has reported on floods, disappearing languages, crop duster pilots, anvil shooters, Manuel Noriega, mule jumps and more.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Anthropology and Spanish from Southeast Missouri State University and a master’s degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

Jacob warns us he won't answer the phone when the St. Louis Cardinals are playing a postseason game. Fun fact: his high school mascot is the Appleknocker.

Ways to Connect

This Jan. 1, 2018 photo shows marijuana on display at Harborside marijuana dispensary in Oakland, Calif.
Mathew Sumner / AP Photo

Oklahoma’s medical marijuana industry will likely conduct business only in cash. That puts a wrinkle in how the state will collect taxes.

State Rep. Cyndi Munson walks door-to-door in Nichols Hills, Okla. as she campaigns for reelection.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Sue Campbell and her husband David stand under a tree at a dog park along a busy highway near Lake Hefner. Their dog is here, too — a 3-year-old ball of furry energy named Louie.

“Louie is a miniature schnauzer and Staffordshire terrier mix,” Sue said.

A worker repairs a utility line in Puerto Rico in late February. He is among 700 utility workers who are members of Edison Electric Institute and are in Puerto Rico as part of a mutual assistance program.
Brian Reil / Edison Electric Institute

Mammoth Energy Services reported second quarter net income of $42.7 million this week. The oil services company signed a $900 million contract in May to continue electric restoration work in hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico.

Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo spoke with KGOU’s Jacob McCleland about the Oklahoma City-based company.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Former Talihina Veterans Center Director Roy Griffith, left, shakes hands with Choctaw Nation Chief Gary Batton at a fall 2017 open house of the veterans nursing home. Former Mayor Don Faulkner watches at right.
Talihina Chamber of Commerce

The Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs put out a request for proposals last month for site selection for a new Talihina Veterans Center in southeastern Oklahoma. The veterans nursing home came under scrutiny following the deaths of two veterans. The new center can be located within 90  miles or 2 hours of Talihina. The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports residents of Talihina are fighting to keep the facility in their small town.

Members of the aircraft maintenance section, help move a T-38 Talon Nov. 1 out of the Vance Air Force Base
United States Air Force

Tony Weedn’s app helps active military service members and their families connect with one another and solve problems that are common to most military families. The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports the BaseConnect app is an invitation-only, military-only network that includes local business listings. He plans to include job openings for spouses, and ride-sharing and home-sharing features, among other things.

TRANSCRIPT

medical marijuana
David Trawin / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Oklahomans will have many legal questions about medical marijuana, but attorneys say existing rules might make it difficult to answer them. Marijuana is illegal at the federal, and rules of professional conduct in Oklahoma prohibit attorneys from counseling or assisting clients in criminal or fraudulent conduct.

Oneok headquarters in downtown Tulsa.
File photo by Rip Stell / Journal Record

A company is asking the Oklahoma Corporation Commission to stop a driller from fracking near an underground natural gas storage facility.

Mick Cornett speaks to his supporters after advancing to the Republican runoff primary election.
Joe Wertz / Oklahoma Engaged

Former Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett will face Tulsa businessman Kevin Stitt in a runoff for the Republican nomination for governor. 

Roy Lenz, a retired farmer, owns the Brandin’ Iron in Laverne, Oklahoma. His bar is in a dry county, so he can only serve low point beer.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Roy Lenz tidies the bar at the Brandin’ Iron on a Saturday afternoon. His wife, Barbara, fires up the grill, filling the place with the smell of hamburger patties, grilled onions and bacon.

“This place was built back in the late 20s, early 30s, and it’s been a bar from the late 30s, early 40s,” Roy said.

SandRidge Energy held its annual shareholder meeting at 123 Robert S. Kerr Ave. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

SandRidge shareholders elected four of Carl Icahn’s nominees to the company’s seven-member board of directors Tuesday, giving the activist investor a slim majority on the board. The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo writes the company will likely be sold, but it is not clear if Icahn will first break SandRidge up into pieces.

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Anthony Bourdain attends the Turner Network 2016 Upfronts at Nick & Stef's Steakhouse
Evan Agostini / Invision/AP

Both centers in Oklahoma that receive calls from the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline are seeing an increase in calls following last week’s deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain.

At HeartLine in Oklahoma City, crisis intervention director Megan Rollins says the number of calls more than doubled last week, as compared to the same week the year before. Last week, the center received 351 calls. During the same week in 2017, 168 calls came in.

Jim Collard, economic development director with the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, speaks during the International Inter-tribal Trade and Investment Organization Conference at the University of Oklahoma College of Law in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Before the formation of boundaries between the United States and Canada, indigenous tribes would trade freely with one another. An organization called the Inter-tribal Trade and Investment Organization, or ITTIO, is trying to restore those connections.

Attorney Jack Fite, representing Public Service Co. of Oklahoma, addresses the Oklahoma Corporation Commission.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Four companies have agreed to support a proposed $4.5 billion wind power project. The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority, Oneta Power LLC, South Central MCN and Tri-County Electric Cooperative reached an agreement with Public Service Co, or PSO, who announced the Wind Catcher project last summer. Wind Catcher could provide up to 2 gigawatts of electricity and could potentially be the largest wind farm in the country.

A fence in a field near Hooker, Oklahoma on May 12, 2018.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Last month was the hottest May on record in Oklahoma. Preliminary data from the Mesonet indicates May finished with a statewide average of 74.6 degrees. That breaks the previous record of 74 degrees, which was set in May 1962.

National Weather Service

Marvin Haworth walks through a house frame that’s under construction in the Seiter Farms development in Moore, Oklahoma.

“You see these hurricane clips right there? You see one at every rafter in the house. They’re all tied to the wall, so that rafter cannot be pulled loose from the wall,” Haworth says as he points toward the connection between the frame’s walls and roof.

Mercy athletic trainer Zane Brugenhemke works on OKC Energy FC goalkeeper Cody Laurendi Tuesday in Edmond.
Emmy Verdin / Journal Record

Professional athletic trainers will be required to obtain at least a Master’s Degree in order to sit for the National Athletic Trainers Association exam. Sarah Terry-Cobo writes in the Journal Record that the new, more stringent requirements will go into place for an industry that is expanding beyond sports teams and into the world of the military and industrial workplaces.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Architect Gary Armbruster of MA+ Architecture designed Canadian Valley Technology Center's new campus in El Reno.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Preschool students run tiny hands through a plastic tub of little blue beads that look like fish. They then scurry across the room to sing “The wheels on the bus” with their classmates.

It’s a bright, colorful, happy room here at the Canadian Valley Technical Center’s Child Development Center in El Reno, Oklahoma. And just a few steps down the hall, child care director Barbi Slimp opens the door to another room that’s just as cheerful.

Marvin Haworth stands outside a home his business is constructing in Moore, Oklahoma on May 14, 2018.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Marvin Haworth walks through a house frame that’s under construction in the Seiter Farms development in Moore, Oklahoma.

“You see these hurricane clips right there? You see one at every rafter in the house. They’re all tied to the wall, so that rafter cannot be pulled loose from the wall,” Haworth says as he points toward the connection between the frame’s walls and roof.

Students Faith Thomas, left, and A’Riyah Stepeny prepare bagels to give to students as part of a free breakfast program at Oklahoma Centennial Mid-High School in Oklahoma City Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Many students at Oklahoma Centennial Mid-High in northeast Oklahoma City often don’t eat breakfast. And when students are hungry, they don’t pay attention and their grades can suffer.

Devon Cuts $75M Deal With DowDupont

May 15, 2018
Devon Tower in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

A commodity hedge deal between Oklahoma City-based energy company Devon and  petrochemical/agriculture giant DowDupont could be a sign of a new trend.

The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo writes the deal will provide “low-risk cash” to Devon, and DowDupont will receive natural gas that will be used to produce plastics, chemicals and other products.

The $75 million deal will last 5 years, according to the Journal Record.

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