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chinese tariffs

Zheng Qu / Gaylord News

As the Trump administration rolls out federal aid for the agriculture industry caught in an escalating international trade war, Oklahoma farmers are waiting for a permanent solution to an uncertain future.  

Tariffs like those from China, imposed in July 2018 on $50 billion worth of U.S. exports, are hitting several sectors of Oklahoma’s agricultural industry. Those tariffs are in retaliation to the Trump administration’s tariffs on billions worth of Chinese industrial goods this summer.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Federal lawmakers failed to pass a new farm bill by the September 30 deadline. Though key programs like crop insurance won’t be affected, funding for others will stop at the end of the year.

 

 

“Some of these other smaller programs are vitally important to farmers,” noted Jimmy Kinder, a wheat and cattle farmer in Walters, Oklahoma. “You need to have a healthy research pipeline to make sure that you stay current.”

Matthias Zomer/Pexels

The Trump administration announced yesterday  $12 billion dollars in relief funding for farmers harmed by tariffs imposed by China, the EU, Mexico, and Canada in response to those levied by the United States. The USDA says the relief will come through subsidies, surplus purchases and the development of new export markets.

Roy Lindsey of the Oklahoma Pork Council expects the funding to become available in September and says it’s a sign that the president is following through on his promises.

USDA/Lance Cheung

The Chinese government plans to implement retaliatory tariffs on $50 billion worth of American goods next month. Although beef is on the list, Oklahoma cattlemen are also keeping an eye on pork tariffs.

 

 

China is an up and coming market for Oklahoma’s cattle ranchers. American producers just regained access to China as an export market when a 14-year ban on U.S. beef exports to the country was lifted last year.