KGOU

investigative

Reveal: Losing Ground

Jun 18, 2018
Ben Fine / Reveal

Picture an American farmer. Chances are, the farmer you’re imagining is white – more than 9 out of 10 American farmers today are. But historically, African Americans played a huge role in agriculture. The nation’s economy was built largely on black farm labor: in bondage for hundreds of years, followed by a century of sharecropping and tenant farming.
 

Nikka Singh / Reveal

Last fall, we threw out a simple question after a show about U.S. immigration policies: What do you wish you knew about immigration?

Across the country, listeners responded with hundreds of text messages – from small towns in Iowa, Colorado and Massachusetts to big cities such as Los Angeles, Atlanta and Chicago.

We chose four questions and took our team of reporters and producers to task to answer them. 

Anna Vignet / Reveal

Some police departments are embracing tactics designed to reduce the use of force – and prevent shootings. Rather than rushing in aggressively, officers back off, wait out people in crisis and use words instead of weapons. It’s a technique called de-escalation.

But this training isn't required in most states. Reveal teams up with APM Reports and finds that most police spend a lot more time training to shoot their guns than learning how to avoid firing them.

Photo illustration by Michael Schiller / Reveal

Reveal digs deep - and gets results. This week’s episode shines a light on the consequences of some recent investigations.

By mining data from 31 million records, we discovered a pattern of racial disparities in mortgage lending across 60 U.S. metropolitan areas. We zeroed in on one city, Philadelphia, to show how black applicants are nearly three times more likely to be denied a home loan than their white counterparts. Now, officials in Philadelphia are demanding changes and accountability.

Across the country, universities are being criticized over issues of money: from how they spend their endowments, to how they raise tuition, to how they award financial aid.
Michael Schiller / Reveal

It’s no secret that college is getting more expensive – or that America’s student debt has erupted into a full-on crisis. But it’s not just loans that are putting pressure on Americans seeking an education. As this week’s episode explains, students face a variety of obstacles, from rising tuition rates to hard-line immigration laws.

Photo illustration by Gabriel Hongsdusit and Michael Schiller / Reveal

With Silicon Valley under the microscope for not living up to its idealistic hype, this week’s episode of Reveal investigates tech companies on the cutting edge that are struggling to solve old-fashioned problems. 

We start with worker injuries at Tesla’s electric car factory in California. Alyssa Jeong Perry of KQED in San Francisco and Reveal’s Will Evans examine what caused the company’s safety problems and whether its claims of improvement hold up.

Gabriel Hongusit / Reveal

In 2016, the Justice Department alleged that Malaysian officials stole billions of dollars from their people and funneled some of it through the United States.

Reveal teamed up with Washington D.C.’s public radio station, WAMU, to dig into one of the largest investigations ever by the Justice Department’s Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative.

It’s a tale that features cameos from Leonardo DiCaprio, Donald Trump, the world’s largest yacht, a Malaysian playboy known for his lavish spending in New York nightclubs, and – as you might imagine – lots of Champagne.

Reveal

It used to be that there was a discrete wildfire season, a period of time where fire risk was highest. Throughout the country, that season is getting longer, and in many places now, wildfire season is happening year-round. Fires are getting bigger, and they’re burning hotter.

Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

A dispute between Oklahoma and federal agencies over relatively high payments for hundreds of doctors who treat Medicaid patients is a key reason state taxpayers are on the hook for $140 million in emergency funds for the state’s two medical schools, records obtained by Oklahoma Watch show.

Reveal: My Town, Chi-Town

Feb 26, 2018
Photo of Lamar Caples by Bill Healy. Photo illustration by Michael I Schiller and Gabriel Hongsdusit / Reveal

Since 2000, a quarter-million black Chicagoans have moved out of the city. The reasons for this reverse migration include decades of bad policy and broken promises on affordable housing, education and public safety. We’re taking a close look at those challenges in this week’s episode, along with some of the people who are rising to meet them.

For People Of Color, Banks Are Shutting The Door To Homeownership

Feb 21, 2018
Sam Ward / Reveal

Fifty years after the federal Fair Housing Act banned racial discrimination in lending, African Americans and Latinos continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans at rates far higher than their white counterparts.

Sam Ward / Reveal

Forty years ago, Congress passed the Community Reinvestment Act, which required banks to lend to qualified borrowers in blighted neighborhoods. The act aimed to eliminate government-sponsored housing discrimination, known as redlining. But it is full of loopholes: It doesn’t apply to mortgage brokers or cover internet banking, and it allows banks to claim credit for loaning almost exclusively to white applicants moving into historically black neighborhoods – supposedly lifting up low-income areas, but also enabling gentrification.

Reporter Tennessee Watson takes us inside the arduous process of seeking justice in her own child sexual abuse case. Her story exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses and spotlights a lack of accountability.
Anna Vignet / Reveal

In light of the conviction of former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar, we’re revisiting an award-winning investigation from 2016.   

Reporter Tennessee Watson says she was sexually abused by her gymnastics coach when she was a kid in the 1980s. More than 25 years later, when she learned he still was coaching children, she called the police. Her inside account of the painful process of seeking justice in her own case exposes discrepancies in prosecutors’ responses to reports of child sexual abuse and spotlights a lack of accountability.

Reveal: Too Many Pills

Jan 29, 2018
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MICHAEL I SCHILLER FOR REVEAL. PHOTO OF PILL BOTTLE AND HANDS BY FRANKIE LEON VIA FLICKR

Drug overdoses now are the leading cause of death among Americans under 50, largely thanks to a surge in opioid use. Although heroin and fentanyl have dominated the headlines in recent years, the problem started with a flood of prescription painkillers, distributed by some of the country’s biggest corporations.

Michael I Schiller / Reveal

In rural Kentucky, a cold case is reopened after 45 years, and investigators dig up an unidentified murder victim in an attempt to give her back her name. The exhumation leads to a series of unexpected revelations about who she was and why she might have been killed.

Her case speaks to the complexity – and importance – of opening cold cases and using DNA science to try to solve them. There currently are more than 10,000 unidentified men and women in the U.S.

Reveal: The Tide Is High

Jan 8, 2018
Gabriel Hongsdusit / Reveal

Last year saw the most destructive Atlantic hurricane season on record. As climate change pushes ocean temperatures ever higher, scientists predict storms will continue growing more severe.

How did we get here? And what steps are we taking to ensure that rising seas and catastrophic weather don’t swallow American communities whole? This week’s episode investigates.

Reveal: A Revealing Year

Jan 1, 2018
In this episode, we look at some of our best reporting from 2017 and how Reveal has made an impact in our world.
Michael I Schiller / Reveal

In this episode, we look at some of our best reporting from 2017 and how Reveal has made an impact in our world.

Our stories covered a lot of ground this year – from the beaches of Bermuda to the politically charged streets of Berkeley, California. And many brought about big changes.

Reveal: Fire And Justice

Dec 26, 2017
In 1988, two powerful explosions shook Kansas City, Missouri, killing six firefighters. Nine years later, five people were convicted of arson and sent to prison for life – but were they innocent?
Gabriel Hongsdusit / Reveal

In 1988, six firefighters in Kansas City, Missouri, were killed in a blast at a highway construction site. Nine years later, five people were convicted of setting the fires that led to their deaths.

Now, almost 30 years later, Reveal investigates problems in the case. There was no physical evidence linking the five to the crime, and their convictions were based on witness testimony – a lot of it conflicting. 

Anna Vignet / Reveal

As special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russia’s meddling of U.S. elections intensifies, we’re revisiting a story that still echoes in Washington’s halls of power: the leaking and publication of the Pentagon Papers. At the center of the episode are two guys in the room where history happened: Robert J. Rosenthal and Daniel Ellsberg.

Rosenthal encountered the Pentagon Papers at the beginning of his journalism career – an entry-level job at The New York Times in 1971.

Reveal: Does The Time Fit The Crime?

Oct 2, 2017
The number of women in U.S. prisons and jails has increased more than 700 percent since 1980. And for 25 years, Oklahoma has led the nation in locking up women. This week on Reveal, we look at the causes behind this spike.
Ben Fine / Reveal

This week on Reveal, we take a look at prisons as a part of our series And Justice for Some.

The number of women in U.S. prisons has increased more than 700 percent since 1980. And for nearly all of that time, Oklahoma has led the nation in locking up women. Reveal Senior Editor Ziva Branstetter teams up with Allison Herrera and The Frontier, an Oklahoma-based investigative news website, to find out why.

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