KGOU

Mick Cornett

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss the results of the August 28 primary runoff. More incumbents were defeated, but looking at non-legislative races complicates the picture. Plus, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Drew Edmondson ramps up his campaign for the general election, hoping to sway Republicans who voted for Mick Cornett in the primary runoff.

 

FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Matt Pinnell, left, and Kevin Stitt talk to reporters at a watch party in Tulsa on Aug. 28, 2018.
Matt Trotter / Oklahoma Engaged

A political outsider will be the Republican party's nominee for governor.

Kevin Stitt, a Tulsa businessman, defeated former Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett in Tuesday's Republican primary runoff. Stitt defeated Cornett 55 to 45 percent. 

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, Sooner Poll’s Bill Shapard joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to assess the Republican gubernatorial runoff and other races. Shapard also shares his thoughts on large numbers of undecided voters in the electorate and how people are waiting longer and longer to make decisions about candidates.

Former state Rep. Joe Dorman meets with voters on the University of Oklahoma campus during his 2014 campaign for governor.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

In this extended episode of Capitol Insider, former state representative and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial candidate Joe Dorman joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss what political candidates are up to following the June 26 primary election.

Former state Rep. Joe Dorman meets with voters on the University of Oklahoma campus during his 2014 campaign for governor.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

 

In this episode of Capitol Insider, former state representative and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Joe Dorman joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss what political candidates are doing following the June 26 primary election. Dorman gives an insider perspective on day-to-day campaigning, local versus statewide strategies and the necessity of fundraising in today’s political system.

 

Oklahoma gubernatorial candidates, 2018
Oklahoma Watch

All of a sudden last week, 15 candidates in the Oklahoma governor’s race were pared to five: one Democrat, two Libertarians, two Republicans.

AP Photo/Bill Waugh

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss what Todd Lamb’s loss means for the remaining gubernatorial candidates.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

 

On this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley assess the results of Oklahoma’s June 26, 2018 primary election.

Voters approved State Question 788, which will legalize medical marijuana, by 58 percent. And approximately 25,000 more people cast votes for 788 than did for the governor’s race.

Voters wait in line at a polling station in Oklahoma City on Tuesday.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Tuesday’s primary elections settled some lingering questions but raised a host of others.

In a historic vote, voters in one of the nation’s most conservative states indicated a readiness to legalize medical marijuana. And Oklahoma’s Republican voters decided that their choice for the next leader of the state will come down to former Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett and Tulsa businessman Kevin Stitt.

Erik Hersman/Flickr

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley are joined once again by political scientist Keith Gaddie.

The three discuss the surge in voter registration ahead of the June 26 primary election, how State Question 788 could affect turnout and the three-way tie in the race for Oklahoma’s governorship.

John Minchillo / AP Images

For the first time since they officially declared for the race, six of the 10 candidates vying for the GOP’s gubernatorial nomination came together Monday for a forum hosted by The Oklahoman.

The six tackled issues ranging from abortion rights to wind taxes as they tried to convince prospective voters watching in person at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art or at home watching the live feed why they should receive their support.

Here are some of the takeaways from the debate:

Tax Increases

Mike Boettcher / Unfiltered

Oklahoma Watch reporter Paul Monies reached out to the 11 declared gubernatorial candidates to ask them what they think about striking teachers’ demands and what more can be done to fund education and get teachers back in their classrooms. Responses came from the candidates or their representatives. Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb’s campaign pointed to an April 2 Fox News interview in which he addressed the strike. Responses have been condensed.

DEMOCRATS:

Drew Edmondson

Oklahoma City Mayor-elect David Holt.
City of Oklahoma City

For the first time in 14 years, somebody other than Mick Cornett will be the mayor of Oklahoma City.

 

But the city’s new mayor-elect already knows his way around the office.

Your Guide To The Oklahoma City Mayoral Primary

Feb 12, 2018
StickWare / Flickr

The primary election for mayor of Oklahoma City will be held on Feb. 13. Candidates David Holt, Taylor Neighbors and Randall Smith are on the ballot.

All Oklahoma City voters registered by Jan.19 are eligible to vote.

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The longer-serving mayor in Oklahoma City's history won't throw his hat in for a fifth term.

Mick Cornett announced on Wednesday that he will not seek reelection in 2018. Cornett has served in the office since 2004 and is the city's first four-term mayor.

He will leave office next April.

“I still love the job as much as I ever have,” Mayor Cornett said said in a statement. “And that makes it a difficult decision. I look forward to this final year in office knowing we have several more milestones to reach.”

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett has been a prominent figure during this week’s Republican National Convention.

He delivered speech Monday on behalf of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, having just taken over as the group’s president in June. Oklahoma City’s elections are technically non-partisan, but Cornett does identify as a Republican (he made it to a runoff with Gov. Mary Fallin in the 2006 Congressional primary when they vied for U.S. Rep. Ernest Istook’s old seat). During Cornett’s address in Cleveland earlier this week, he talked a lot about the success of Republican mayors across the country.

Mick Cornett, Chair, U.S. Conference of Mayors and Mayor of Oklahoma City speaks during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016.
Mark J. Terrill / AP

Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett described success by GOP municipal leaders during the first day of the Republican National Convention Monday afternoon in Cleveland.

Cornett said Republicans hold the top jobs from San Diego to Miami, including Oklahoma’s two largest cities. He said Republicans have held the Oklahoma City mayor’s seat for 29 consecutive years.

Workers repair a road in Oklahoma City, July 9, 2014.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Mayor Mick Cornett says the next iteration of the MAPS sales tax could be used to repair crumbling infrastructure in Oklahoma City, but reiterated it likely won’t come this year.
Voters will consider renewing Oklahoma City's general obligation bond in 2017, and a street development impact fee will also take effect.

On Monday, Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett became president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Over the weekend, the group met in Indianapolis to elect Cornett and lay out a broad policy agenda for the next year -- much of which focused on advocating in Washington. Mayors will focus on pushing for congressional funding to combat the Zika virus, improve infrastructure and treat opioid addiction.

Mick Cornett, the mayor of Oklahoma City, grew up there and saw the city he now leads rebound from the 1995 bombing of the Murrah federal building. He’s the incoming head of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, which meets in Indianapolis this weekend.

In a conversation with Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd, Cornett weighs in on how a city recovers from a terrorist attack, and describes the crisis facing virtually every mayor in the U.S.: how to pay for repairs to crumbling infrastructure like roads and bridges.

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