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The Trump administration announced yesterday  $12 billion dollars in relief funding for farmers harmed by tariffs imposed by China, the EU, Mexico, and Canada in response to those levied by the United States. The USDA says the relief will come through subsidies, surplus purchases and the development of new export markets.

Roy Lindsey of the Oklahoma Pork Council expects the funding to become available in September and says it’s a sign that the president is following through on his promises.

USDA/Lance Cheung

The Chinese government plans to implement retaliatory tariffs on $50 billion worth of American goods next month. Although beef is on the list, Oklahoma cattlemen are also keeping an eye on pork tariffs.

 

 

China is an up and coming market for Oklahoma’s cattle ranchers. American producers just regained access to China as an export market when a 14-year ban on U.S. beef exports to the country was lifted last year.

Conservative Party Leader and Prime Minister, Theresa May, addresses delegates during a speech at the Conservative Party Conference at Manchester Central, in Manchester, England, Wednesday, Oct. 4, 2017.
Rui Vieira / AP

Trade between Oklahoma and the United Kingdom is thriving, and it’s Karen Bell’s job to promote and enhance trade and investment.

Karen Bell is the Consul General of the United Kingdom, stationed in Houston, Texas. Oklahoma falls within the five-state area in which she works.

“The UK is already the fifth largest market for exports of goods and services from Oklahoma. And the value actually to your local economy on trade with the UK, is getting on for half a billion dollars,” Bell told KGOU’s World Views.

World Views: October 11, 2013

Oct 10, 2013

The European Union is now pledging to help Italy after a boat capsized last week and killed hundreds of African migrants. Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss how European governments are struggling with refugee and asylum policies.

Richard Clarke is famously known for criticizing the Bush Administration for not doing enough to stop 9/11.  But he now focuses on issues of cybersecurity and intellectual property theft, especially by the Chinese government.

'Economic War Every Day': How China Steals U.S. Secrets

Oct 10, 2013
Aude / Wikimedia Commons

Former counter-intelligence czar Richard Clarke is best known for testifying before the 9/11 Commission that President George W. Bush failed to take enough action to protect the country ahead of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Since leaving the Bush Administration in 2003, Clarke has turned his attention to cybersecurity. He’s the author of the 2010 book Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It.

“I think for a lot of people a threat is not a threat unless people die,” Clarke says. “But hundreds of billions of dollars move. Cyber crime works.”