KGOU

Election 2016

illustration of U.S. Capitol
Annette Elizabeth Allen / NPR

The Senate Judiciary Committee is holding a hearing Wednesday morning about foreign agents and attempts to influence the U.S. election. The panel is among the bodies investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Senators had requested Donald Trump Jr. and Paul Manafort, President Trump's former campaign chairman, to appear as witnesses. Instead, they are in closed-door discussions for now.

The video will appear as the hearing begins at approximately 10 a.m. ET and will be archived once the hearing concludes.

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner speaks to reporters outside the White House in Washington, Monday, July 24, 2017.
Alex Brandon / AP

Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, told lawmakers in a statement on Monday that he "did not collude... with any foreign government."

Former Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson testifies before the House Intelligence Committee on June 21, 2017
NPR

Wednesday is another big day of testimony before two Congressional committees investigating Russian attempts to influence the 2016 Presidential election. Notably, former Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson (under President Obama) is scheduled to appear Wednesday before the House Intelligence Committee. 

Senate Russia Probe Going to Plan, Says Lankford

Apr 25, 2017
U.S. Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., talks to supporters during the Republican watch party in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016.
J. Pat Carter / AP

The U.S. Senate investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election is moving steadily, despite reports to the contrary, said Oklahoma Senator James Lankford in an interview with NPR's Rachel Martin on Tuesday morning.

 

Donald Trump takes the oath of office
Mark Ralston / AFP/Getty Images

Follow NPR's live blog of Inauguration Day for news highlights, analysis, photos and videos from Washington, D.C., throughout the day.

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Donald Trump speaks during a news conference on Wednesday in New York, his first as president-elect.
Seth Wenig / AP

For the first time in 167 days, President-elect Donald Trump held a wide-ranging news conference.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors across the newsroom, live-annotated the speech. Portions of the transcript with added analysis are underlined in yellow, followed by context and fact checks below.

Note: The transcript was updated throughout the press conference. While we are working to correct errors, it may contain discrepancies and typographical errors.

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin and Oklahoma Secretary of State Michael Hunter address the media after the state's electors cast their on Dec. 19, 2016.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

All seven of Oklahoma’s electors voted at the state Capitol Monday in favor of Donald Trump. The Republican president-elect won 65 percent of the popular vote in Oklahoma and carried every county in the state.

David Oldham, an elector from Tulsa, said he took his role seriously. He examined news reports to determine whether he thought Trump could serve as president, including Russian hacking allegations. He said there’s no proof Trump was involved in the hacks.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt arrives at Trump Tower in New York on December 7, 2016.
Andrew Harnik / AP

Donald Trump wants Scott Pruitt to run the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The Oklahoma attorney general is a fierce ally of fossil fuel companies and one of the EPA’s biggest opponents. The nomination draws a sharp line dividing industry and environmentalists that could test the limits of another big fight: state sovereignty.

A Republican president created the EPA. Using words and phrases that, today, might jeopardize his career before it ever left a state GOP primary, Richard Nixon urged Congress to sign off on what he called his “environmental agenda.”

Donald Trump campaigning at an immigration policy speech at the Phoenix Convention Center in Phoenix, Arizona.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0)

From board rooms to drilling rigs, much of the U.S. fossil fuel industry has been counting down the days until President Barack Obama turns over the keys of the White House. Donald Trump doesn’t officially take the wheel of the nation’s energy policy for a couple of months, but Oklahoma’s oil and gas industry says its prospects have already improved under the president-elect.

World Views: November 11, 2016

Nov 11, 2016

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot discuss the international reaction to Tuesday’s election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States.

Then Rebecca talks with Mexican author Nadia Villafuerte’s Her work focuses on the difficulties Central American migrants face coming across Mexico’s southern border. They'll also discuss women's and gender issues and access to education.

A supporter of Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump at the Oklahoma Republican Party's watch party at Main Event in Oklahoma City
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

There were few surprises at the national level as Oklahoma voters overwhelmingly chose Republican nominee Donald Trump to become the 45th president of the United States.

A line forms outside the Crown Heights Christian Church in Oklahoma City shortly after 8 a.m. on Election Day, Nov. 8, 2016..
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Polls opened at 7 a.m. across Oklahoma, and the State Election Board says nearly 1,000 extra pollworkers are manning precincts today. Several polling places throughout the metro had long lines, with some voters waiting for anywhere from an hour to 90 minutes Tuesday morning.

Find Your Polling Place With Google's Help

Nov 8, 2016
A poll worker rips "I Voted" stickers from a roll at a polling place in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 24, 2014.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

If you haven't voted since the last presidential election, your polling place might have changed.

Google has built this map-based web tool to help spread information about the general election on Tuesday, Nov. 8. Information is available in English or Spanish.

Type in your home address to see where to vote and what will be on your ballot.

Santiago and Marco Arzate in the back room of their storefront property on Southwest 25th Street in Oklahoma City.
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged

As KGOU and KOSU began crafting ideas for our collaborative election project Oklahoma Engaged, we were interested in several forms of storytelling. This included informative and in-depth radio stories and video profiles of folks in a south Oklahoma City district.

Oklahoma Voter Profile: Ligia Barona

Nov 3, 2016
Ligia Barona
Josh Robinson / Oklahoma Engaged

As KGOU and KOSU began crafting ideas for our collaborative election project Oklahoma Engaged, we were interested in several forms of storytelling. This included informative and in-depth radio stories and video profiles of folks in a south Oklahoma City district.

An elections clerk cuts from a strip of "I voted" stickers at a polling place in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, June 28, 2016.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Early voting in Oklahoma got underway Thursday morning and runs through Saturday.

State Election Board spokesman Bryan Dean says voters will be able to cast ballots from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday and Friday, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at county election boards across Oklahoma.

Our Collaborative 'Oklahoma Engaged' Coverage Of The 7 State Questions

"You may still see a few lines, but it will probably move a little faster than it might on Election Day,” Dean said.

Support technician Jeff Hardin works on a voting machine Monday in the Will Rogers Building in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Almost 3,000 voting machines will be accepting ballots in Oklahoma on Election Day. But what if one of them breaks?

Tucked into cramped quarters inside the Will Rogers Building near the state Capitol is an office with two technicians, and as many as 30 ballot-counting machines in for repair. The workers also make “house calls” doing preventative maintenance year-round, The Journal Record’s Dale Denwalt reports:

Greg Mashburn, Oklahoma District 21 District Attorney (left), and Kris Steele, Executive Director of The Education and Employment Ministry (right), debate State Questions 780 & 781 during an October 18, 2016 Oklahoma Watch-Out forum in Oklahoma City.
Oklahoma Watch

State Questions 780 and 781 propose making significant changes to Oklahoma’s criminal justice system in an effort to lower the state’s incarceration rates. SQ 780 proposes to change the classification of certain drug possession and property crimes from felony to misdemeanor offenses. SQ 781 would create the County Community Safety Investment Fund to hold and redistribute any savings achieved by incarcerating fewer people for drug possession or nonviolent crimes — the intent of

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