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Navigating Another Back-To-School Mystery: Vaccinations

Health officials are concerned fewer children are current on their immunizations. And parents must rely on 2-year-old school vaccination data.

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Updated at 8:07 p.m. ET

At his Bedminster, N.J., golf resort on Saturday, President Trump signed four executive actions to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus pandemic. The actions amount to a stopgap measure, after failing to secure an agreement with Congress.

The three memorandums and one executive order call for extending enhanced unemployment benefits, taking steps to stop evictions, continuing the suspension of student loan repayments, and deferring payroll taxes.

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Oklahoma's unemployment rate has more than doubled in the past few months as COVID-19 and weakness in the energy sector have combined to put increasing numbers of workers out of jobs. In just over two months, the Oklahoma Employment Security Commission has expedited the claims process and dramatically reduced the pending claim backlog. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley talked to OESC interim executive director Shelley Zumwalt about the agency's big challenges and how the agency is changing to meet the demand.

Updated at 7:10 p.m. ET

The top counterintelligence official in the U.S. government warned Friday of ongoing interference and influence efforts by China, Russia and Iran.

William Evanina, who leads the National Counterintelligence and Security Center, said that the U.S. government has assessed that China prefers President Trump losing the election, because Beijing considers him "unpredictable," while Russia is working to undermine Democrat Joe Biden.

Each week, we answer "frequently asked questions" about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions."

Updated at 8:45 a.m. ET

U.S. employers added 1.8 million jobs last month, as the unemployment rate dipped to 10.2%.

The pace of hiring slowed from June, when employers added a record 4.8 million jobs. That suggests a long road back to full employment for the tens of millions of people who have been laid off during the coronavirus pandemic.

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Two weeks after President Trump signed an executive order "Lowering Drug Prices By Putting America First," the White House still hasn't released the text of the order. The unorthodox move is apparently a leverage play, an attempt to squeeze drug companies into offering concessions, but so far there's little indication Trump is getting the deal he was after.

Trump had American flags and women in white lab coats behind him, his big presidential sharpie marker in hand when he signed the order July 24.

Updated at 12:45 a.m. ET Friday

Some of Beirut's residents, angered by their city's seeming negligence that led to this week's deadly warehouse explosion, took to the streets late Thursday to demand reform.

Near parliament, Lebanese security forces fired tear gas as they clashed with anti-government protesters.

In the central square of Beirut's mostly destroyed downtown, a group of Lebanese, some carrying shovels to dig through the debris, shouted, "The people want the fall of the regime."

Updated at 2 p.m. ET

The attorney general of New York took action Thursday to dissolve the National Rifle Association following an 18-month investigation that found evidence the powerful gun rights group is "fraught with fraud and abuse."

Attorney General Letitia James claims in a lawsuit filed Thursday that she found financial misconduct in the millions of dollars and that it contributed to a loss of more than $64 million over a three-year period.

Can You Get COVID-19 Twice?

Aug 6, 2020
This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the virus that causes COVID-19.
NIAID-RML / AP

People who think they have recovered from COVID-19 have seen positive test results and worried that they’re infected a second time. But local medical researchers say that's unlikely, at least in the short term.

Oklahoma City Public Schools Board voted in late July to delay the first day of school and start out the semester entirely online.
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Kari Phillips is nervous for herself and her fellow teachers.

“The anxiety levels are through the roof,” she said.

The eighth grade math teacher at Kerr Middle School in Del City is prepping for many  possible scenario. She knows any subject she covers might have to be delivered in person, online or in a combination of the two.

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