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1 year after devastating floods, Pakistan is still reeling

A boy drinks water from a line connected with a waterfall on the outskirts of Mingora, the main town of Pakistan's Swat valley The flooding in Pakistan killed at least 1,700 people, destroyed millions of homes, wiped out swathes of farmland, and caused billions of dollars in economic losses. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, residents had to rely on contaminated water, so now authorities are taking steps to prepare for the next disaster. (Naveed Ali/AP)
A boy drinks water from a line connected with a waterfall on the outskirts of Mingora, the main town of Pakistan's Swat valley The flooding in Pakistan killed at least 1,700 people, destroyed millions of homes, wiped out swathes of farmland, and caused billions of dollars in economic losses. In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, residents had to rely on contaminated water, so now authorities are taking steps to prepare for the next disaster. (Naveed Ali/AP)

This month marks one year since unprecedented floods ravaged Pakistan, killing more than 1,700 people, displacing millions more and wiping out swathes of lush farmland. A year on, much of Pakistan still hasn’t fully recovered.

Here & Now‘s Deepa Fernandes speaks to Shah Meer Baloch, a reporter with The Guardian based in Islamabad, about how the country is faring.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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