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The Red Bud dispensary in Marlow, Oklahoma.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

Medical Marijuana Businesses Say Patient Drives Are Key To Access, But Lawmakers Want To End It

The Red Bud Dispensary in Marlow, Okla. looks like an Apple store, with white walls and track lighting. The dispensary is packed with people, but they aren’t here to buy medical marijuana. The dispensary hasn’t technically opened yet, so it doesn’t even have THC products – the mainly middle-aged crowd is standing around empty glass cases. They are here for something else – a doctor’s recommendation.

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Kevin Stitt, candidate for the Republican nomination for Oklahoma Governor, speaks in Guthrie, Okla., Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Attorney General Mike Hunter approved Gov. Stitt’s conflict of interest plan late last week. Stitt submitted his plan in early January, focusing mostly on separating himself from Gateway Mortgage Group, the lending company he founded in 2000.

Updated at 5:44 p.m. ET

Darrell Blatchley received a call from the Philippines' Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources early Friday morning reporting that it had a young Cuvier's beaked whale that was weak and vomiting blood.

Within a few hours it was dead.

Blatchley, a marine biologist and environmentalist based in the Philippine city of Davao, gathered his team to drive two hours to where the whale had washed up.

Much of Tahlequah is included in one of Oklahoma’s Opportunity Zones, which offer tax breaks for new investments, but the Tahlequah-based Cherokee Nation can’t take advantage of a key part of the new tax law.
Tesina Jackson / Tahlequah Daily Press

Native American tribes across the country were left out of a major part of a new federal tax incentive for opportunity zones, with their governments unable to pool investments to support projects in some of the nation’s poorest areas. 

For 18-year-old high school senior Ellie Rapp of Pittsburgh, the sound of her family chewing their dinner can be ... unbearable.

"My heart starts to pound. I go one of two ways. I either start to cry or I just get really intensely angry. It's really intense. I mean, it's as if you're going to die," she says.

Rapp has been experiencing this reaction to certain noises since she was a toddler. She recalls a ride home from preschool when her mother turned on the radio and started singing, which caused Rapp to scream and cry hysterically.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET on Monday

A powerful cyclone that tore through Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe this past week has destroyed roads, bridges and homes and left more than 200 people dead and tens of thousands displaced across the affected region.

About 1.5 million people in total have been affected by Cyclone Idai's torrential rains and winds that have reached speeds of up to 200 kilometers, or 124 miles, per hour, according to the United Nations.

Updated at 6:03 p.m. ET

Data retrieved from the black boxes of the Ethiopian Airlines crash that killed all 157 people on board last week show "clear" similarities with the crash of a Lion Air jet in Indonesia last October.

John Boehner has been known to enjoy the occasional adult beverage. He famously nicknamed his negotiations over raising the nation's debt ceiling in 2011 the "Nicorettes and Merlot sessions." Nicorette because that's what President Obama would chew during the talks. Merlot because that was the drink of choice for the former speaker of the House.

A youth movement that started with a teenager in Sweden spread across the world on Friday, evidenced by the students from London to New Delhi who skipped school to take part in demonstrations calling for action on climate change.

Sue Ogrocki/AP

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss a whirlwind week at that state capitol. The two discuss the new powers of Oklahoma's governor, new regulations on medical marijuana and controversial abortion legislation. 

Updated at 4:56 p.m. ET

President Trump used his veto pen for the first time Friday, after Congress tried to reverse his national emergency declaration and rein in spending on a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Congressional critics do not appear to have the votes to override Trump's veto. So, as a practical matter, the administration can continue to spend billions of dollars more on border barriers than lawmakers authorized, unless and until the courts intervene.

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