KGOU

News

Pixabay

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss a last minute effort to repeal Oklahoma's newest gun law and more. 

Raising The Kindergarten Age In Oklahoma May Leave Some Children Out

Aug 15, 2019
Heather Canales reads to children in a pre-kindergarten class at WovenLife, which offers early childhood development in Oklahoma City. Photo taken on August 1, 2019.
Lenora LaVictoire / StateImpact Oklahoma

A controversial proposal in the Oklahoma state legislature would delay the age kids would be eligible to start kindergarten and put Oklahoma on-trend with dozens of other states. But some childhood experts say the trend may not serve Oklahoma kids well.

An artist’s conception shows a proposed expansion of the 10th Street bridge over Interstate 235 in Oklahoma City would include walkable space alongside traffic as part of an innovation district.
Courtesy Perkins & Will

City and state entities are considering developing Oklahoma City's Innovation District into a research hub. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses the project's potential $1.2 billion economic impact and how it could create 6,600 new jobs while strengthening nearby neighborhoods, parks and schools.

pexels.com

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Every spring, summer, and early fall, generally in the mornings, listeners may occasionally experience a fuzzy or noisy signal. Our transmitters and your radio are fine – this disruption is caused by tropospheric ducting, also called temperature inversion.

When the air gets warmer in higher altitudes and cooler in lower altitudes, this atmospheric condition permits interference with local stations by distant stations on the same frequency.  The fuzzy signal generally will clear up by noon.

Bobak Ha'Eri

Native children are far more likely to end up in state custody, and the Indian Child Welfare Act aims to keep them within tribal communities. Last fall, a federal district judge in Texas ruled ICWA was unconstitutional, calling it a “race-based law.” But on Friday the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision.

Kevin Stitt is shown speaking at a forum hosted by Edmond Republican Women on May 21.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

This is part two of our most recent conversation with Gov. Stitt. He shares his thoughts on Medicaid expansion and the investigations into the state's largest virtual charter school. 

Oklahoma Hospitals Sue Thousands Each Year Over Unpaid Medical Bills

Aug 9, 2019
Saint Francis Health System, Norman Regional Health System and AllianceHealth Woodward were among the hospitals or systems that sued patients the most over unpaid bills.
Photo of Saint Francis Hospital: Stephen Pingry/Tulsa World

It was not a call that  Rabekah Crow expected.

The Bartlesville resident was working  at her job as  a Phillips 66 help-desk agent  in spring 2018 when an unfamiliar number  flashed across her  caller ID.

“The  person  just  said they  were outside of my work and were delivering papers for me to sign,” she said. “So I thought, ‘No big deal.’”

When she came out, she was served with a lawsuit demanding payment of nearly $3,500 in medical bills from the birth of her youngest son in 2015.

Medical Boards Lack Process For Opioid Complaints

Aug 9, 2019
Narcan, also known as Naloxone is an opiate overdose antidote.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

The ongoing court case against opioid manufacturer Johnson & Johnson highlighted the role that doctors, and the medical boards who regulate them, have played in the continuing public health crisis.

Tens of thousands of people listen regularly to KGOU, but still, it can feel like a solitary existence sometimes.

In radio, the listening experience becomes real through the voices we hear -- voices of the reporters and hosts who illuminate the events of the day, the voices of those interviewed who are living the story that we're hearing about, or voices raised in song. To borrow from the philosopher Descartes, we hear them, therefore, they are.

Kenneth Statton programs a CNC machine on the shop floor at MST Manufacturing in Claremore.
MST Manufacturing

In the first half of 2019, 38 businesses have announced plans to make investments in Oklahoma. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses the reason for this wave of investments and the potential economic impact on the state.

Gun Deaths In Oklahoma: Trends, Laws And Survival

Aug 6, 2019
A glimpse from 2016 into a bucketful of confiscated guns in the Oklahoma City Police Department’s property room.
Michael Willmus

Mass shootings in Texas and Ohio over the weekend have put gun deaths and firearm laws back in the spotlight.

Oklahoma’s last major mass shooting event was in 1986, when 14 people were killed at an Edmond post office. But the state’s death rate from guns used in both suicide and homicide has been rising and a major loosening of gun regulations is upon us when the state’s new “permitless carry” law goes into effect Nov. 1.

News Fatigue

Aug 5, 2019
Mariarosa-Rockefeller

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Maybe you’re experiencing it: that feeling you’re just worn out by the news and are tired of the constant churn of updates and chatter.

In journalism these days, we call that “news fatigue.” Audience research indicates it’s a real thing. 

We’re hearing from people, loyal listeners, who want us to report on something different, tell positive stories, stories that make them feel better.

Gov. Kevin Stitt describes how he plans to implement campgin promises.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Tribal gaming negotiations got off to a rough start last month. Now, Gov. Stitt is responding to pushback and explains why he thinks tribes should pay more for the exclusive rights to operate casino games in Oklahoma.

Did Lobbying Efforts Influence Spending On School Panic Button?

Aug 2, 2019
The Rave Mobile Safety app features a large "active shooter" button at the top and other buttons for reporting emergencies such as a fire or medical emergency.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

A $3 million taxpayer-funded program will soon give schools across the state access to a relatively untested “panic button” app that can alert authorities and staff if there is an active shooter, fire or emergency in the school.

Gary Leonhardt is a Democratic voter living in Norman.
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

In 2016, Oklahoma voters passed two state questions intended to reduce the state’s prison population. Every year since, lawmakers have introduced bills designed to help decrease the number of people serving time.

Oklahoma Energy Project To Be Largest Of Its Kind In U.S.

Jul 31, 2019
A wind farm in Ellis County in western Oklahoma.
Logan Layden / StateImpact Oklahoma

Western Farmers Electric Cooperative has entered into an agreement with NextEra Energy Resources to build the largest combined wind, solar and energy storage project in the country. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses how this project could impact Oklahoma and potential challenges these companies could face.

peggydavis66 / Flickr.com

Twenty-nine tribal leaders sent a letter to Gov. Stitt saying they “stand united” when it comes to Oklahoma’s Gaming Compact. The letter followed the governor’s announcement in early July that he wants to renegotiate the agreement, which allows tribes to operate casino games in exchange for giving the state a percentage of their revenue through “exclusivity fees.”

KGOU

This is the Manager’s Minute.

We’re pleased to announce installation is complete on the new KROU transmitter, located on the Spencer/Oklahoma City tower that we lease from our friends at KFOR Television.

We did this thanks to grant funding from the Anne & Henry Zarrow Foundation and gifts to Karen’s Legacy Fund, in honor of former KGOU general manager Karen Holp.

People who listen to KGOU on 105.7 will notice improved audio quality and a more reliable signal.

The old transmitter, which served us since 1992, is now a backup.

Dick Pryor/KGOU

Gov. Kevin Stitt announced his intention to renegotiate Oklahoma's gaming compacts, the agreements governing Indian gaming in the state, through an op-ed earlier this month. Matthew Morgan, who leads the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association, discusses how tribes have reacted to the governor's approach and what they need from him to play ball. 

A sign is seen outside of 50 Penn Place in Oklahoma City, where Epic Charter Schools leases 40,000 square feet for administrative use.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma investigators believe Epic Charter Schools embezzled money by inflating its enrollment with homeschool and private school students. Because of the state’s dedication to privacy, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister says the alleged abuse would not have been preventable under current state law.

Pages