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University of Oklahoma President David Boren announces the first Indigenous Peoples' Day October 12, 2015 outside the Bizzell Memorial Library on the south end of campus.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma’s Board of Regents announced Wednesday that former President David Boren resigned from his position as president emeritus and professor. The news came about 8 months after the board began investigating alleged sexual misconduct by Boren.

EPA Announces Grants For Environmental Cleanup In OKC And Tulsa

Jun 12, 2019
Oklahoma City’s Brownfield Revolving Loan program was a factor in revitalizing a former Bricktown steelyard complex into The Steelyard retail and apartment community.
(Steelyard/NE Property management)

The Environmental Protection Agency recently awarded grants to Oklahoma City and Tulsa for the cleanup and redevelopment of brownfield sites. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses how the EPA defines a brownfield site, the history of the program in OKC and how communities across the nation are benefiting from the grants. 

The Devon Energy Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs

Devon Energy says it will voluntarily reduce methane emissions from its operations in the United States by at least 12 percent by 2025.

Help Us Serve You

Jun 11, 2019

This is the Manager’s Minute.

KGOU is on a July through June fiscal year, so now’s the time when we make plans for the year ahead.

That means looking at our programming schedule and deciding how to deliver the news, information, entertainment and discussion programs you count on every day, while mixing in a few new things to keep our schedule fresh and within our budget.

If you have thoughts about KGOU’s programs, and new programming ideas you’d like for us to explore, let us know by emailing programming@kgou.org.

Cheaper, stripped-down health plans could soon see a resurgence in Oklahoma, potentially reducing the number of uninsured while leaving policyholders with unexpected medical bills.

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services’ Human Services Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Gov. Stitt has decided to replace the head of the Dept. of Human Services, one of Oklahoma's largest state agencies, with Justin Brown, the CEO of a company that owns assisted living facilities in Oklahoma and neighboring states. In this episode, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss this and more. 

Michael Payne sorts through boxes of donated food at the end of the 2019 school year at Northeastern State University.
Caroline Halter / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma has slashed funding for higher education by over 25 percent since 2008. In response, each public university has raised tuition, but the cuts have had a disproportionate effect on the state’s 11 regional institutions and the students they serve.

The River Spirit Hotel and Casino has floodwaters surrounding it on the Arkansas River in Tulsa.
Tom Gilbert / Tulsa World via AP

Recent flooding and dam releases are affecting businesses and key industries in Oklahoma. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses how the flooding has effectively shut down the Port of Catoosa, impacted the state's agriculture industry and postponed the reopening of the River Spirit Casino Resort in Tulsa.

Oklahoma City Homeless Alliance

Each year the Oklahoma City Homeless Alliance conducts a point-in-time count of people experiencing homelessness. It’s a census of those in shelters, transitional housing, meal sites and living on the street.

This year volunteers counted 1,273 homeless adults and children in Oklahoma City, an eight percent increase from 2018.

NPR

June is Black Music History Month, and each Sunday this month KGOU has special programming to celebrate Black gospel music’s profound influence on early rock and soul music.

This month, KGOU will bring you the special series, Gospel Roots of Rock and Soul, hosted by Grammy award-winning gospel singer Cece Winans. The series includes three one-hour documentary programs and a fourth hour of original music highlighting the power and influence of gospel.

Vaccination has become a dirty word at the Oklahoma Capitol.

Sue Ogrocki/AP

May was one of the wettest months ever in Oklahoma, with parts of the state receiving record rainfall. Many communities are still dealing with the aftermath, and those efforts could be complicated by more heavy rain this month.

OU Price Center for Economic and Management Research

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor speaks with Dr. Robert Dauffenbach about his recent analysis of Oklahoma tax collections dating back to 1990. After adjusting for inflation and population growth, Dauffenbach found that per-capita tax collections remain below their pre-Great Recession peak.

Gov. Kevin Stitt and legislators celebrated a budget deal in the waning days of the session.
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Multiple polls show the majority of Oklahoma voters support criminal justice reforms.

Survey data commissioned by Oklahoma Public Radio stations for the Oklahoma Engaged Project also suggest a majority of voters believe the state’s sentencing laws need to be reworked.

Oklahoma is now the number one incarcerator in the country, but only one bill targeting prison population control reached the governor’s desk this session.

Jessica Collett, assistant sexual assault nurse examiner coordinator at the Women’s Resource Center in Norman, demonstrates the dangers of strangulation on a mannequin head.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

On a June night last year, an argument broke out at an Atoka County home.

A woman’s teenage daughter was playing loud music, and her husband asked her to tell the daughter to turn the music off. The argument escalated, and the woman said her husband “put both hands around her neck and choked her” so that “she felt her body being lifted off of the ground by her neck,” a court affidavit said.

NextEra Energy Cancels Plans For Two Wind Power Projects

May 29, 2019
Wind turbines in western Kingfisher County.
Journal Record

NextEra Energy Resources has withdrawn plans to construct two wind farms in western Oklahoma. The decision follows Governor Kevin Stitt signing a law that ensures wind turbine construction doesn't interfere with low-level military training routes.

A new report from the Office of Workforce Development shows Oklahoma is on track to experience a shortage of nearly 20,000 workers next decade due to projected economic growth, high rates of retirement and a lack of local talent.

 

“It’s an issue of both not having enough people and then also not the right skills to replace people,” explained spokesperson David Crow.

 

Julie Jones, Gaylord College

This is the Manager’s Minute.

KGOU and StateImpact Oklahoma reporters were big winners when the names were announced in the latest Oklahoma journalism awards competition – the Society of Professional Journalists.

All told, KGOU and StateImpact reporters captured 15 of the 24 radio awards.

StateImpact earned six awards, including firsts won by Quinton Chandler, Jackie Fortier, Emily Wendler and Joe Wertz, for Government and Criminal Justice Reporting, Feature Reporting, Diversity Reporting and Special Program.

Sue Ogrocki/AP Images

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the final week of the 2019 legislative session. After approving a budget, lawmakers passed several criminal justice reforms, but they left one on the table: bail reform. 

Moratorium Passed To Fight 'Food Desert' In Northeast Oklahoma City

May 22, 2019
Graphics on the front window of a Dollar Tree are shown next to graphics illustrating fresh produce on the front windows of the closed Save-A-Lot in the Northeast Town Center in Oklahoma City.
Molly M. Fleming

The Oklahoma City City Council passed a 180-day moratorium to combat what some council members have called a 'food desert' in the city’s northeast side. Journal Record reporter Molly Fleming discusses the city’s next step in making fresh meat and produce more accessible to the area's residents.

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