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Oklahoma News

Featured Four: Earthquake Meetings; Boren To Run?; New Chalkboards; College Preparedness

Oilfield trucks line up at Overflow Energy's Oakwaood No. 1 disposal well in western Oklahoma.
Joe Wertz
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StateImpact Oklahoma
Oilfield trucks line up at Overflow Energy's Oakwaood No. 1 disposal well in western Oklahoma.

Four stories that were trending or generated discussion online or on KGOU’s social media platforms during the past week.

Oklahoma ended 2015 with a record number of earthquakes, and 2016 had barely gotten underway when Edmond residents were rattled by another 4.2 magnitude earthquake. On Thursday, the University of Central Oklahoma hosted hundreds of people for a forum led by State Rep. Lewis Moore.

On Friday, lawmakers hosted a meeting at the state Capitol with such a high turnout that it had to be moved into the main House chamber.

Then-U.S. Rep. Dan Boren talking with former President Bill Clinton during a 2011 meeting of the Blue Dog Coalition of conservative Democrats in New York.
Credit Blue Dog Coalition / U.S. House of Representatives
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U.S. House of Representatives
Then-U.S. Rep. Dan Boren talking with former President Bill Clinton during a 2011 meeting of the Blue Dog Coalition of conservative Democrats in New York.

All eyes are focused on November’s presidential contest, and Oklahoma’s next gubernatorial election is still more than two years away. But political observers felt the first rumblings of who might try to succeed Gov. Mary Fallin when the heir to a nearly eight-decade Oklahoma political dynasty expressed interest in the seat his father held 40 years ago. But after former U.S. Rep. Dan Boren told the Associated Press he might seek the post, his potential predecessor, University of Oklahoma president David Boren, issued a statement saying he didn’t think it was a good idea.

chalkboard_6.jpg
Credit Emily Wendler / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange
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Oklahoma Public Media Exchange
A 1917 map outlining the boundaries of Indian Territory discovered at Emerson High School in Oklahoma City.

Last year, the discovery of accidentally preserved chalkboard drawings dating from 1917 at Emerson High School made national news. A little over a week ago, Oklahoma City Public Schools announced via social media they’d found even more during further renovation at the high school along Walker Ave. near Midtown.

Reader Rita Bosico wrote on Facebook: “I enjoy seeing their art in everything they do. It had an excellence to it.”

Tulsa Community College freshman Zoey Radcliffe, center, looks at her notes while preparing for a final in her remedial math course. Thousands of Oklahomans take remedial college courses each year to relearn content they should have learned in high school
Credit Nate Robson / Oklahoma Watch
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Oklahoma Watch
Tulsa Community College freshman Zoey Radcliffe, center, looks at her notes while preparing for a final in her remedial math course. Thousands of Oklahomans take remedial college courses each year to relearn content they should have learned in high school

A data-driven investigative piece by our colleagues at Oklahoma Watch explored the stories of students who graduated from high school, yet discovered they needed remedial courses before they were truly ready for college. The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education says about 39 percent of incoming freshmen at state colleges and universities had to pass at least one remedial course before starting their major. Math was the most common subject students needed help with, at a rate twice as high as English.

A reader whose profile identifies him or her as Family Field Guide called the situation “pitiful” and “pathetic,” writing: "Are schools afraid of hurting kids' self-esteem? Is the curriculum that "dumbed down?" I am led to believe all these things are true! It's especially sad that so few graduates, only 269 or 10% from OKC and Tulsa high schools, are able to attend the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State. And that percentage would be lower, the story said, if they counted drop-outs."

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