Caroline Halter | KGOU
KGOU

Caroline Halter

KGOU Producer/Reporter

Caroline produced Capitol Insider and did general assignment reporting from 2018 to 2019. She joined KGOU after a stint at Marfa Public Radio, where she covered a wide range of local and regional issues in far west Texas. Previously, she reported on state politics for KTOO Public Media in Alaska and various outlets in Washington State.

Caroline has a bachelor’s degree in international studies from Seattle University and speaks Spanish proficiently. As part of her degree, she edited for a Tibetan newspaper in Northern India and conducted independent research in rural Kenya.

Ways to Connect

Bobak Ha'Eri

Native children are far more likely to end up in state custody, and the Indian Child Welfare Act aims to keep them within Indigenous communities. Last fall, a federal district judge in Texas ruled ICWA was unconstitutional, calling it a “race-based law.” But on Friday the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed that decision.

Kevin Stitt is shown speaking at a forum hosted by Edmond Republican Women on May 21.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

This is part two of our most recent conversation with Gov. Stitt. He shares his thoughts on Medicaid expansion and the investigations into the state's largest virtual charter school. 

Gov. Kevin Stitt describes how he plans to implement campgin promises.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Tribal gaming negotiations got off to a rough start last month. Now, Gov. Stitt is responding to pushback and explains why he thinks tribes should pay more for the exclusive rights to operate casino games in Oklahoma.

peggydavis66 / Flickr.com

Twenty-nine tribal leaders sent a letter to Gov. Stitt saying they “stand united” when it comes to Oklahoma’s Gaming Compact. The letter followed the governor’s announcement in early July that he wants to renegotiate the agreement, which allows tribes to operate casino games in exchange for giving the state a percentage of their revenue through “exclusivity fees.”

Dick Pryor/KGOU

Gov. Kevin Stitt announced his intention to renegotiate Oklahoma's gaming compacts, the agreements governing Indian gaming in the state, through an op-ed earlier this month. Matthew Morgan, who leads the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association, discusses how tribes have reacted to the governor's approach and what they need from him to play ball. 

A sign is seen outside of 50 Penn Place in Oklahoma City, where Epic Charter Schools leases 40,000 square feet for administrative use.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Oklahoma investigators believe Epic Charter Schools embezzled money by inflating its enrollment with homeschool and private school students. Because of the state’s dedication to privacy, State Superintendent of Public Instruction Joy Hofmeister says the alleged abuse would not have been preventable under current state law.

A sign is seen outside of 50 Penn Place in Oklahoma City, where Epic Charter Schools leases 40,000 square feet for administrative use.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Epic Charter Schools is under state and federal investigation. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitols Shawn Ashley discuss alleged embezzlement of taxpayer dollars by Epic's founders, as well as the history of virtual charter schools in Oklahoma and how they are regulated. 

Dick Pryor/KGOU

In this episode of Capitol Insider, Lieutenant Governor Matt Pinnell joins KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley to discuss his plans for improving Oklahoma's image and diversifying the economy. 

Sixth grade science teacher Melissa Lau prepares a lesson on climate change using "tree cookies" for her students at Piedmont Intermediate on July 1, 2019.
Caroline Halter / StateImpact Oklahoma

Melissa Lau is preparing for the coming school year. She teaches 6th grade science in Piedmont, just northwest of Oklahoma City. Inside her classroom, she’s laid out over thirty cross sections from the trunks of red cedar trees. Each ring represents one year of growth. Lau calls them “tree cookies.” 

Caroline Halter/KGOU

DJ and producer Stevie Johnson recently completed his PhD at the University of Oklahoma in higher education administration focusing on the experiences of black men at historically white colleges. In addition to a traditional written dissertation, he created a Hip-Hop album called “Curriculum of the Mind.”

money
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the new state budget, which goes into effect July 1. The two discuss how lawmakers are dictating agency spending and moving money around to make the budget work.

A campaign to expand government health insurance to more low income Oklahomans overcame its first legal hurdle Tuesday. The Oklahoma Supreme Court ruled the effort can move forward just hours after hearing oral arguments.

Oklahoma is one of 14 states that has not expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. A group called Oklahomans Decide Healthcare hopes to change that by gathering enough signatures to put a constitutional amendment on the ballot in 2020.  

The summary, or “gist,” of the signature-gathering petition reads:

Pixabay

College graduates are leaving Oklahoma at higher rates than any other demographic group according to the Kansas City Federal Reserve. New research shows the state lost a record number of college graduates from 2013 to 2017.

 

Dick Pryor/KGOU

In this episode of Capitol Insider, freshman Democratic Senator Mary Boren shares her thoughts on Oklahoma's political process, including why she thinks the state legislature is not equipped to deal with "complex issues."

University of Oklahoma President David Boren announces the first Indigenous Peoples' Day October 12, 2015 outside the Bizzell Memorial Library on the south end of campus.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

The University of Oklahoma’s Board of Regents announced Wednesday that former President David Boren resigned from his position as president emeritus and professor. The news came about 8 months after the board began investigating alleged sexual misconduct by Boren.

The Devon Energy Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs

Devon Energy says it will voluntarily reduce methane emissions from its operations in the United States by at least 12 percent by 2025.

The Oklahoma Department of Human Services’ Human Services Center in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Gov. Stitt has decided to replace the head of the Dept. of Human Services, one of Oklahoma's largest state agencies, with Justin Brown, the CEO of a company that owns assisted living facilities in Oklahoma and neighboring states. In this episode, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss this and more. 

Michael Payne sorts through boxes of donated food at the end of the 2019 school year at Northeastern State University.
Caroline Halter / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma has slashed funding for higher education by over 25 percent since 2008. In response, each public university has raised tuition, but the cuts have had a disproportionate effect on the state’s 11 regional institutions and the students they serve.

Oklahoma City Homeless Alliance

Each year the Oklahoma City Homeless Alliance conducts a point-in-time count of people experiencing homelessness. It’s a census of those in shelters, transitional housing, meal sites and living on the street.

This year volunteers counted 1,273 homeless adults and children in Oklahoma City, an eight percent increase from 2018.

Sue Ogrocki/AP

May was one of the wettest months ever in Oklahoma, with parts of the state receiving record rainfall. Many communities are still dealing with the aftermath, and those efforts could be complicated by more heavy rain this month.

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