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Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Booker Prize judges have whittled down the books still in consideration for the prestigious literary award from 151 submissions to six finalists.

Just over a week after Luis Castillo and Octavio Dotel headlined a list of suspects named in the Dominican Republic's recent drug trafficking bust, a local judge has cleared the retired MLB players of money laundering charges. Judge José Alejandro Vargas decided Thursday that the prosecution had failed to show enough evidence to implicate Castillo or Dotel.

Less than three weeks after Jeffrey Epstein's suicide in prison, a federal judge has formally closed the sex trafficking case against the wealthy financier. On Thursday, Judge Richard Berman of the Southern District of New York approved a request filed by prosecutors to dismiss the charges.

President Trump and Vice President Pence are taking one small step that they hope will mark a giant leap toward the military branch they want for outer space. At a ceremony Thursday at the White House, the pair plan to take part in a ceremony commemorating the return of the U.S. Space Command after a 17-year hiatus.

Updated at 5:37 p.m. ET

Confronted with a torrent of lawsuits across the U.S., several major drug companies are in discussions with authorities to resolve thousands of opioid-related suits filed against them. A government source close to the negotiations tells NPR that Purdue Pharma, Johnson & Johnson, Endo International and Allergan are looking to cut deals.

Updated at 2:30 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Epstein is dead, but that doesn't mean his accusers have been silenced.

Updated at 7:17 p.m. ET

Seven major publishing houses say that Audible, the audiobook company owned by Amazon, is violating copyright law with a planned speech-to-text feature that's set to launch next month. In a lawsuit filed Friday in federal court, the publishers allege that the feature, Audible Captions, repurposes copyrighted work for its own benefit by transcribing audiobooks' narration for subscribers to read along as they listen.

The company behind the controversial Keystone XL pipeline has won a major victory in Nebraska, where environmental activists, two Native American tribes and some local landowners had sought to derail its construction. The state's Supreme Court on Friday ruled unanimously in favor of an alternate route proposed by TC Energy, formerly known as TransCanada.

After weeks of public silence, the tycoon believed to be Hong Kong's richest man pulled out the stops when finally he finally weighed in on the unrest seething in his backyard. Li Ka-shing, a mega-investor worth more than $27 billion at last check, took out full-page ads in two of his local newspapers, the Hong Kong Economic Times and Hong Kong Economic Journal.

Fires in Brazil's Amazon rainforest are proliferating at an alarming rate.

That's the gist of an announcement this week by the country's National Institute for Space Research, or INPE. According to the agency, there have been 74,155 fires in Brazil so far this year — most of which erupted in the Amazon. That represents an astonishing leap of more than 80% over last year and by far the most that the agency has recorded since it began compiling this data in 2013.

Two former Major League Baseball stars, pitcher Octavio Dotel and infielder Luis Castillo, have been implicated in a massive drug trafficking bust in the Dominican Republic. The country's attorney general, Jean Alain Rodríguez, announced Tuesday that the operation targeted alleged drug kingpin César Emilio Peralta, also known as "César the abuser," and the extensive criminal operation he led.

For months, Hong Kong's streets have seethed with discontent. Scenes from the semiautonomous region show protesters, sometimes numbering in the hundreds of thousands, many wearing surgical masks and carrying umbrellas that have come to signify resistance.

The images are astonishing, and the issues that set the protests in motion are complex.

So here's a primer breaking down the major players, why they have poured into the streets and the response so far from China.

It has been a tumultuous quarter century for San Francisco, what with the rise of its neighbor, Silicon Valley, and the changes that came with it. But at least a couple of things have stayed reliably consistent, such as the distinctive Bay Area fog that's so familiar it even has a name (just call it Karl) and the live webcam that watches it from the campus of San Francisco State University.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Jeffrey Epstein died by suicide in his Manhattan prison cell, according to the office of New York City's chief medical examiner. The office announced its findings in a statement released Friday afternoon, six days after the wealthy financier was found unresponsive while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.

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Trish doesn't have many places to turn. She's living at her elderly father's home without a job because she can't afford the care he needs. And every day she says the balance sheet seems stained with more red ink.

"It's all outgoing. There's nothing coming in, that's for sure. And I'm stuck in a rock and a hard place because of my credit, so I don't — I need to make enough money that I can afford to live somewhere," she says, voice quavering.

Across from her at the table, David Perez nods quietly and takes notes.

When President Trump tweeted his racist remarks Sunday, asking why certain Democratic congresswomen don't just "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came," he did not just take aim at the four women of color — three of whom were born in the U.S.

Updated at 11:25 p.m. ET

The St. Louis Blues beat the Boston Bruins 4-1 in Boston to claim their first Stanley Cup championship in franchise history.

The Blues scored twice in the first period despite being outplayed for much of that time. Boston outshot St. Louis 12-4 in the first period, but the Bruins were unable to get one past Blues rookie goaltender Jordan Binnington. He ended game with 32 saves.

Linda Fairstein, the longtime New York City prosecutor turned prolific crime novelist, is no longer with her publisher after a firestorm of criticism erupted over her work in a famous — and recently dramatized — trial three decades ago.

Dutton, an imprint of Penguin Random House, confirmed to NPR that it and Fairstein "have decided to terminate their relationship." A spokesperson for Dutton declined to offer any further details on the decision.

Just about eight months after Barnes & Noble revealed it was exploring a possible sale, the embattled bookseller has settled on a buyer.

The mega-chain, which boasts 627 locations across the U.S., announced Friday that the Elliott Management Corp. has agreed to buy Barnes & Noble for about $683 million — a price tag that includes the bookseller's debt, which Elliott will take on as part of the deal.

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