Colin Dwyer | KGOU
KGOU

Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Bogdan Bartnikowski recalls occasionally asking older inmates, out of innocence or desperation, when he would be released from Auschwitz. He recalls, too, the answer that inevitably came back.

"You want to be free?" they would tell Bartnikowski, who was 12 at the time. After a mirthless laugh, they would point to the chimneys. "This is how you get out. There is no other way out."

On a typical Friday, the Gare de Lyon railway station in Paris would be positively seething with travelers hustling to catch their trains or greet arrivals. After all, it saw some 110 million passengers walk through its doors last year alone.

This, however, was not exactly a typical Friday in Paris.

Roughly a week after a massive explosion tore through a petrochemical plant in Port Neches, residents of the Southeast Texas city are being asked to leave to avoid its lingering effects.

On Thursday morning officials in town and Jefferson County reaffirmed a voluntary evacuation order due to high levels of a harmful chemical in the area.

On Tuesday night, four young artists had a chance to join a pantheon of Turner Prize winners, a list studded with a slew of marquee names. Like many of the awards handed out in the arts community, from the National Book Awards to the Oscars, the judges were expected to pluck just one winner from the crop of finalists — just as the prize named for painter J.M.W.

Amid a clergy sex abuse scandal that has engulfed the Catholic Church in the U.S., one name has drawn more controversy than most: Bishop Richard Malone of the Diocese of Buffalo, N.Y. For months, the bishop had resisted calls for his resignation for allegedly mishandling abuse claims against the priests of his diocese.

Malone bowed to that pressure Wednesday.

Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat has bowed to mounting popular pressure and announced his plans to resign in the new year.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

During a surprise Thanksgiving Day visit to troops stationed in Afghanistan, President Trump said that his administration has reopened peace talks with the Taliban, nearly three months after he abruptly canceled them. Trump made the announcement at a rally staged at Bagram Airfield outside Kabul, where he exchanged handshakes and posed for photographs with U.S. troops.

At least four Ebola response workers are dead and six others injured after a pair of attacks overnight against health facilities in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A World Health Organization official on Thursday described the killings as "unmistakably a directed attack at the [Ebola] response."

Across Albania, survivors of Tuesday's earthquake are combing the wreckage of homes and buildings and seeking signs of life in the rubble.

Holiday travelers have just one day until their Thanksgiving buffets — but before many can tuck into drumsticks and potatoes, they can expect to be buffeted by severe weather. The National Weather Service is warning of two big storm systems across the U.S. — one tacking up the Great Lakes and into New England on Wednesday, while the other is already making its presence felt in the West.

The past two days have not been kind to Joseph Muscat.

Back in September, India's hopes for a historic first ended — inconclusively.

High hopes had been riding on its Chandrayaan-2 orbiter. The spacecraft was sending a landing vehicle down to the moon — an operation that, if successful, would be the first robotic mission at the moon's unexplored south pole and that would make India only the fourth country in history to make a moon landing.

Just a day after Hong Kongers cast ballots overwhelmingly for pro-democracy candidates, handing them control of 17 of the region's 18 district councils, authorities in Hong Kong and Beijing have taken markedly different tacks in responding to the landslide.

Just more than a month since dozens of dead migrants were discovered in a truck in southeast England, the driver has admitted to conspiring to assist unlawful immigration and acquire criminal property. Maurice Robinson pleaded guilty to the two charges at a court hearing Monday in London.

Fires are laying waste to wide swathes of land across Australia on scales that are tough to comprehend. In the southeastern state of New South Wales alone, where about 60 fires remain ablaze, the infernos have consumed some 4,000 square miles of land — or an area roughly eight times the size of Los Angeles.

Let's start by stating the obvious: Australia is not the U.S.

Now, self-evident as that statement may seem, it is one thing to simply accept the lesson when reading it on a page — and quite another to experience the lesson viscerally, day after blazing day, mile after grueling mile, as you try to run the entire length of each landmass.

Katie Visco knows that difference.

Updated at 11:45 a.m. ET

A judge has blocked the U.S. government's plan to begin executing federal prisoners for the first time in nearly 20 years. U.S. District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan issued a preliminary injunction Wednesday halting four executions set to begin next month over concerns about the government's lethal injection method.

Updated at 10:04 p.m. ET

More than 1,700 books began the autumn with a chance at winning a National Book Award. Now, after a swanky ceremony Wednesday night in Manhattan, the folks behind just five of those books have each emerged with a trophy, a purse of $10,000 and the right to slap that precious gold medallion on the front cover of their work.

The winners of the 70th annual National Book Awards are:

Picture, for a second, just how vast New York City is. All told, including Staten Island, the Bronx and every block in between, the massive metropolis takes up more than 300 square miles. Now, try to picture a hunk of land more than 12 times that size.

That's about how much of the Amazon rainforest was destroyed in just the span of a year, according to Brazilian authorities.

Updated on Nov. 21 at 4 p.m. ET

A global megacorporation best known for Band-Aids and baby powder is now on the hook for about $107 million less than originally anticipated over its role in Oklahoma's opioid crisis.

In a judgment filed Friday, state District Judge Thad Balkman revised an earlier ruling against Johnson & Johnson and told the drugmaker to make a onetime payment of $465 million — not the $572 million he had originally ordered.

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