Mary Louise Kelly | KGOU
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Mary Louise Kelly

Mary Louise Kelly is a co-host of All Things Considered, NPR's award-winning afternoon newsmagazine.

Previously, she spent a decade as national security correspondent for NPR News, and she's kept that focus in her role as anchor. That's meant taking All Things Considered to Russia, North Korea, and beyond (including live coverage from Helsinki, for the infamous Trump-Putin summit). Her past reporting has tracked the CIA and other spy agencies, terrorism, wars, and rising nuclear powers. Kelly's assignments have found her deep in interviews at the Khyber Pass, at mosques in Hamburg, and in grimy Belfast bars.

Kelly first launched NPR's intelligence beat in 2004. After one particularly tough trip to Baghdad — so tough she wrote an essay about it for Newsweek — she decided to try trading the spy beat for spy fiction. Her debut espionage novel, Anonymous Sources, was published by Simon and Schuster in 2013. It's a tale of journalists, spies, and Pakistan's nuclear security. Her second novel, The Bullet, followed in 2015.

Kelly's writing has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Politico, Washingtonian, The Atlantic, and other publications. She has lectured at Harvard and Stanford, and taught a course on national security and journalism at Georgetown University. In addition to her NPR work, Kelly serves as a contributing editor at The Atlantic, moderating newsmaker interviews at forums from Aspen to Abu Dhabi.

A Georgia native, Kelly's first job was pounding the streets as a political reporter at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. In 1996, she made the leap to broadcasting, joining the team that launched BBC/Public Radio International's The World. The following year, Kelly moved to London to work as a producer for CNN and as a senior producer, host, and reporter for the BBC World Service.

Kelly graduated from Harvard University in 1993 with degrees in government, French language, and literature. Two years later, she completed a master's degree in European studies at Cambridge University in England.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You may have heard by now about the interview my colleague Mary Louise Kelly, co-host of All Things Considered, did yesterday with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. But because of the impeachment trial airing on most of our member stations, you may not have actually heard the interview, so we air that interview for you now, start to finish, no edits. At the end, you'll hear Mary Louise tell her co-host Ari Shapiro what happened after the interview.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST)

MARY LOUISE KELLY: Secretary of State, good to see you.

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

All right. Audie, I got a question for you. Guess how cold it has been in parts of the Canadian province of Alberta this week.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

All right. I'll bite. How cold?

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, BYLINE: Our team on this reporting trip in Iran is all-female - me, my producer Becky Sullivan, our interpreter and our photographer. So we figured, why not explore somewhere a male reporter couldn't?

(SOUNDBITE OF DOORBELL)

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Hey, U.S. You started it. We will end it. Those words were printed on signs carried through Tehran today as the casket of an Iranian general made its way through the streets.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In more than 40 years of confrontation between the United States and Iran, few moments have felt as perilous as this one.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

As we say goodbye to 2019 and ring in 2020, we're bringing you a new cocktail invented to set the tone in the new year.

Eddie Kim is co-host of the Shift Drink podcast, a traveling drinks consultant for the Highball Committee based out of Washington, D.C., and a bartender at large. To set the tone for 2020, Kim created "Truth and Clarity."

"When I thought about the vibe of 2020 that I wanted, the first two things that came to mind were truth and clarity. A clean slate to start the new year," Kim says.

The drink is light and crisp, with a refreshing lemon taste.

Before the words "Ukraine" and "impeachment" dominated headlines, before most Americans had heard of Marie Yovanovitch or Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman — Adam Schiff sat down to write a cryptic letter.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Four witnesses testified before the House Intelligence Committee on Tuesday in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump: Jennifer Williams, an aide to Vice President Pence; Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a National Security Council adviser; Kurt Volker, the former U.S. special envoy to Ukraine; and Tim Morrison, a former National Security Council adviser. Click the audio link to listen to a special broadcast of NPR hosts and reporters offering analysis on the significant moments of the day.

A onetime member of the Trump administration has some mildly critical words for her old boss but disagrees with Congress' efforts to impeach him.

Former Ambassador to the U.N. Nikki Haley said in an interview with NPR on Friday that "it is not a good practice for us ever to ask a foreign country to investigate an American" — referring to President Trump's efforts to get Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden, his potential 2020 opponent.

But, she added, "I don't see it as impeachable."

Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam vows it's "a new day and a new landscape" in Virginia. He says when Democrats take over the state legislature for the first time in a generation at the start of the new year, passing gun violence prevention laws will be a top priority.

He adds guns "shouldn't be a partisan issue," even though he says he's prepared to pass new "common sense" gun laws without Republican support.

Edward Norton's new movie Motherless Brooklyn is the first he wrote, directed and stars in.

A noir detective film set in 1950s New York, the film sees Norton playing Lionel, a private eye with Tourette's syndrome. He twitches and blurts out words — as is typical of Tourette's. He's also brilliant, with an incredible memory.

Even when he's praising his spy chiefs, President Trump can't resist taking a swipe.

The instinct was on full display this past weekend, as he announced the killing of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

"Thank you, as well, to the great intelligence professionals who helped make this very successful journey possible," he said in an address from the White House on Sunday.

His intelligence officials are ''spectacular," "great patriots," the president went on.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Even when he's praising his spy chiefs, President Trump can't resist taking a swipe. The instinct was on full display this weekend as he announced the killing of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

I was a girl once, but not any more.

That's the first sentence of Edna O'Brien's new novel. It goes on:

I smell. Blood dried and crusted all over me, and my wrapper in shreds. My insides, a morass.

The new series Unbelievable on Netflix tells the true story of a woman named Marie, who was raped when she was 18.

Instead of investigating the rape, the police investigated her. The man who assaulted Marie went on to rape several more women.

The story was the subject of a blockbuster investigation from ProPublica and The Marshall Project. It won a Pulitzer Prize in 2016.

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