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Renee Montagne

Renee Montagne, one of the best known names in public radio, is a Special Correspondent and Host for NPR News.

Montagne's most recent assignment has been a yearlong collaboration with ProPublica reporter Nina Martin, investigating the alarming rate of maternal mortality in the U.S., as compared to other developed countries. The series, called "Lost Mothers," has won every major award in American journalism, including a Peabody award, a George Polk Award, Harvard's Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Journalism. The series was also named a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize.

From 2004 to 2016, Montagne co-hosted NPR's Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. She also co-hosted All Things Considered with Robert Siegel for two years.

After leaving All Things Considered, Montagne traveled to South Africa in early 1990, arriving to report there on the day Nelson Mandela was released from prison. Four years later, she and a small team of NPR reporters were awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Silver Baton for their coverage of the country's historic elections that elevated Mandela to the Presidency.

Since 9/11, Montagne has made ten extended reporting trips to Afghanistan. She has traveled to every major city, from Kabul to Kandahar, to peaceful villages, and to places where conflict raged. She has profiled Afghanistan's presidents and power brokers, but focused on the stories of Afghans at the heart of that complex country: school girls, farmers, mullahs, poll workers, soldiers, midwives, and warlords. Her coverage has been honored by the Overseas Press Club, and, for stories on Afghan women in particular, by the Gracie Awards.

One of her most cherished honors dates to her days as a freelance reporter in the '80s, when Montagne was awarded "First Place in Radio" by the National Association of Black Journalists for a series on African American musicians marching to the wars of the 20th century.

Montagne graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of California, Berkeley. Her career includes teaching broadcast writing at New York University's Graduate Department of Journalism (now the Carter Institute).

Abdulkhalek Dabaa, one of fewer than 30 doctors left in the besieged Syrian city of Aleppo, is the only remaining ophthalmologist in the eastern part of the city. Medical supplies are scarce, so he has resorted to making his own eyedrops. His wife, an obstetrician, relies on folk remedies for her patients.

Scott Pruitt, Oklahoma attorney general, gestures as he speaks at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Monday, April 8, 2013.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

One of the most contentious issues facing this new school year is which bathrooms and locker rooms transgender students will be allowed to use.

The Obama administration has issued what it calls guidance that students be allowed to use facilities consistent with their gender identity. The administration warned that schools refusing to do that could risk their federal school funding.

If you want a peek into the history of drugstores, there's the History of Pharmacy Museum at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, in Tucson, Ariz.

A hand-carved wood prescription counter helps recreate the look of a small-town pharmacy in the 1800s. And some of the old-timey medicines give you a sense of what the place must have smelled like.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And we're also remembering two colleagues who were killed yesterday in Afghanistan. NPR photojournalist David Gilkey and interpreter Zabihullah Tamanna were in an Afghan military convoy when their vehicle came under fire.

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In 1991, a political drama mesmerized the nation. A law professor named Anita Hill had made a stunning accusation — that Clarence Thomas, then a Supreme Court nominee, had sexually harassed her when she worked for him at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

The events that ensued are now the subject of the HBO film Confirmation, which premieres Saturday at 8 p.m. ET. Kerry Washington, who you probably know best as Olivia Pope on Scandal, plays Hill, who was very reluctant to reveal this decade-old secret.

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You wouldn't expect a Pulitzer Prize-winning food critic to take you to the sort of place that's wedged between a 99-cent store and a boarded-up meat market.

But that's exactly where I sat down for lunch with Jonathan Gold — at a downtown Los Angeles eatery called El Parian.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Here on the West Coast, along with turkey and trimmings, there's a highly-prized delicacy on some holiday tables - fresh Dungeness crab pulled right out of the Pacific.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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President Obama talks with Rep. Paul Ryan during the nationally televised bipartisan meeting on health insurance reform at Blair House in Washington, D.C., Feb. 25, 2010.
Pete Souza / The White House

The House of Representatives has no new leader in sight.

This time last week House Republicans were reeling from the announcement by frontrunner and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) that he was suddenly dropping out of the race to succeed Speaker John Boehner, whose earlier decision was equally shocking. The Congressman many are pinning their hopes on now is Paul Ryan, who doesn't want to be Speaker.

There are others interested in the job. The question is can any of them bring together a group seemingly at war with itself.

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Say the name Malala and instantly one thinks of a heroine known to millions, the schoolgirl from Pakistan's lush, once idyllic Swat Valley who dared speak out when the Taliban invaded her home and tried to prevent girls from going to school.

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