Scott Detrow | KGOU
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Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a political correspondent for NPR. He covers the 2020 presidential campaign and co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015. He reported on the 2016 presidential election, then worked for two years as a congressional correspondent before shifting his focus back to the campaign trail.

Before that, he worked as a statehouse reporter in both Pennsylvania and California, for member stations WITF and KQED. He also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia Silver Baton and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, and also has a master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Donald Trump has written 15 books. But one stands out, his 1987 bestseller, "The Art Of The Deal."

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: (Singing) The art of the deal.

Hillary Clinton channeled a little bit of Donald Trump in San Diego on Thursday afternoon, delivering a blistering attack on her likely Republican opponent's qualifications to run the country.

"Making Donald Trump our commander in chief would be a historic mistake," Clinton told a cheering, and at times laughing, audience.

Picture this. An email pops into your inbox. It promises to help you "make some real money and live the kind of life that you thought was only for 'rich' people." To help you "spend your life living it your way."

The pitch sounds promising, because it's December 2008, and the economy has collapsed all around you.

Bill Clinton may finally deem Jerry Brown fit to be on the same platform as Hillary Clinton.

The California governor is endorsing Clinton a week ahead of California's primary, framing the decision as a response to the threat posed by a potential Donald Trump presidency.

Donald Trump has broken rule after rule on his way to becoming the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

Now, Trump may be ready to break another.

High-tech data operations have become a mainstay of presidential campaigns over the past two decades.

But Trump recently told an interviewer that he sees data as "overrated."

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

I'm Ari Shapiro, and it's time for All Tech Considered.

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Donald Trump marched through the Republican presidential primary field this year on the strength of a focused message: America used to be great. It isn't anymore. And that's mostly the fault of the Obama administration.

On Thursday, Trump applied that same thesis to American energy production. "America's incredible energy potential remains untapped," he told a North Dakota audience in what was billed as a major policy address. "It's totally self-inflicted. It's a wound, and it's a wound we have to heal."

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

From Political Reporter Scott Detrow:

For many people interested in policy and politics, Robert Caro's The Power Broker is a sort of bible.

As the Democrats' primary process begins to wind down, the big question on a lot of people's mind is, what does Bernie Sanders want?

The Vermont senator now has a lot of clout within the Democratic Party, and is in the position to demand some changes.

One thing Sanders has voiced concerns about is how Democrats vote for president: He's made it clear he doesn't like closed primaries, where only Democrats can vote.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Walk around a Scranton/Wilkes-Barre Railriders game talking to Donald Trump supporters, and you'll hear a whole bunch of different reasons people in Northeastern Pennsylvania are supporting him.

Some Trump backers say they're worried about ISIS. Others say the economy is their top concern. But every person eventually returns to the same central quality he is most passionate about in the likely Republican nominee: the fact that he's not a typical politician.

For hard-line conservatives, the past few months have been a time to embrace long odds.

At first, their hope was that Ted Cruz could claw just enough electoral votes away from Donald Trump to force a contested Republican national convention.

Now that Trump is the de facto nominee, the latest against-all-odds plan is for some conservative, somewhere, to launch a third-party presidential bid and challenge Trump from the right.

Hillary Clinton snagged another endorsement over the weekend, but don't expect her to trumpet it on the campaign trail.

"I have a little announcement to make ... I'm voting for Hillary. I am endorsing Hillary," noted conservative author P.J. O'Rourke said on NPR's Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me. The episode aired over the weekend.

Donald Trump could solidify his position as the Republican Party's all-but-certain nominee with a win in Indiana Tuesday.

Ted Cruz is hoping an endorsement from Indiana Gov. Mike Pence could help him buck recent polls and carry the Hoosier State.

It took them nearly two months to do so, but John Kasich and Ted Cruz are finally taking Mitt Romney's advice.

When the 2012 Republican nominee lambasted front-runner Donald Trump in March, he called for a strategic effort to stop the New York businessman.

Donald Trump wants the Republicans to alter the party platform on a fundamental issue for many conservative activists — abortion.

The GOP platform, which is formally adopted at the Republican National Convention, has included language every election year since 1984 with support for a human life amendment to the Constitution and a call for "legislation to make it clear that the Fourteenth Amendment's protections apply to unborn children."

(The 14th Amendment says no state shall "deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.")

You might have noticed something different about Republican presidential front-runner Donald Trump lately.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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This was supposed to be a quiet week for Mike Rendino. He manages Stan's, the bar across the street from Yankee Stadium, and the Yankees are in Toronto.

Instead, it's been bedlam.

Rendino said he's "been inundated with phone calls, emails, contacts on Facebook from the strangers, most random people. The New York Times, the Washington Post."

On the way into the Colorado Republican Party's state convention in Colorado Springs Saturday morning, a Ted Cruz supporter waved a big broom with the letters "CRUZ" fastened to the top.

The convention took place in a hockey arena, and the prop is probably familiar to most sports fans. The Cruz supporter was looking for a sweep, and a sweep was what he got.

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