KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee | KGOU
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KGOU Sunday Radio Matinee

Sundays 12 - 1 p.m.

Public radio has many excellent limited-run programs that are regularly featured in this 'variety' hour: Intelligence Squared U.S., America Abroad, and others. The Sunday Radio Matinee also plays host to KGOU's own documentary productions and various other special content offerings. 

This week's Sunday Radio Matinee feature: 

Sunday, June  20, 2021 @ noon  

Life Stories - Families: Fathers, Sons & Brothers

Join noted public radio storyteller and producer, Jay Allison, for a special hour of stories about dads, brothers and various father figures. These are public radio stories made over many years, by producer Jay Allison -- working together with Christina Egloff, and friends, colleagues, neighbors, strangers and whoever would take the loan of one of his tape recorders. They are are stories about life as we find it, and record it.     

Past Sunday Radio Matinee Features:

Ways to Connect

The KGOU Readers Club rounds out its special look into important books related to the Tulsa Race Massacre as the 100th anniversary of the destruction of Black Wall Street approaches on Memorial Day and into June 1st. This week, Dr. Karlos K. Hill, author of The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre: A Photographic History. 

The KGOU Readers Club continues it’s study of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre as the 100th anniversary of that dark chapter in Oklahoma’s history approaches. This week, KGOU managing editor Logan Layden is joined by OU professor and author Rilla Askew, who wrote the novel Fire In Beulah, a fictionalized work that dramatizes the massacre and the events leading up to it. It’s one of the first examples of the massacre in popular culture. 

KGOU

The KGOU Readers Club continues its look at the Tulsa Race Massacre as the 100th anniversary of the destruction of Tulsa’s Greenwood District, also known as Black Wall Street, approaches. 

Oklahoma Historical Society

On the night of May 31st and through the morning of June 1st in 1921, in Tulsa Oklahoma’s Greenwood district, also known as Black Wall Street, roving bands of white Tulsans all but destroyed the prosperous black community that was thriving there. It was a violent riot where people were gunned down, their homes and businesses burned, and their possessions looted.

It's been a turbulent time, with a deadly pandemic and a chaotic — sometimes violent — political climate. In the midst of all this, NPR is marking a milestone; on May 3, 2021, the network turns 50 years old.

Food Insecurity In The U.S. By The Numbers

Sep 27, 2020

With COVID-19 continuing to spread, and millions of Americans still out of work, one of the nation's most urgent problems has only grown worse: hunger.

Fred T. Korematsu Institute

On Feb. 19, 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066. It had been just ten weeks since the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor thrust the United States into World War II. The order required Japanese-Americans to report to detention camps in the U.S., on short notice and with few possessions, and it was justified for national security. A young Japanese-American named Fred Korematsu refused to go and was convicted of violating the order.

OU Center For Middle East Studies

The United States and Iran haven’t had formal diplomatic relations since the so-called Islamic Revolution which led to the 1979 ouster of the Shah and capture of fifty-two American diplomats and citizens for some 444 days. 

The January 3, 2020 U.S. airstrike that killed Iranian general Qasem Soleimani is the latest escalation of tensions between the two nations and the impetus for a recent public forum sponsored by the University of Oklahoma’s Center for Middle East Studies. 

Without gospel music there never would have been an Aretha Franklin, an Elvis Presley, a Ray Charles, a James Brown, or an Al Green.

APM Reports

Apprenticeships can provide a ticket to the middle class for people who’ve been left behind by “college for all.” Supporters on both the right and the left say the “earn while you learn” approach can help create a more skilled workforce, provide a path to solid, middle-class careers, and serve as a needed corrective to the “college for all” push that has left some students with piles of debt and no obvious career.

APM Reports

Mario Martinez and Katy Sorto were the first in their families to go to college. They started at community college in 2008 hoping to earn degrees, but the odds were against them.

Katherine Zhou / APM Reports

If you want to move up in America, go to college. That’s the advice people get. And there’s loads of evidence that a college degree will improve your economic prospects. But a new project by a group of economists shows that some colleges are doing a much better job than others when it comes to promoting social mobility.

The year 1968 will long be remembered for its political and social upheaval. As Americans reeled from the assassinations of two prominent leaders and sentiment deepened against the Vietnam War, politicians from both parties struggled to respond to aggravated constituents and build consensus.  

KGOU

In this hour-long special, KGOU’s Dick Pryor speaks with David Boren, who retired as president of the University of Oklahoma on June 30, 2018 after serving in the position for over two decades.

The year 1968 will long be remembered for its political and social upheaval. As Americans reeled from the assassinations of two prominent leaders and sentiment deepened against the Vietnam War, politicians from both parties struggled to respond to aggravated constituents and build consensus.  

The year 1968 will long be remembered for its political and social upheaval. As Americans reeled from the assassinations of two prominent leaders and sentiment deepened against the Vietnam War, politicians from both parties struggled to respond to aggravated constituents and build consensus.  

Intelligence Squared U.S.

Around the world, technology is disrupting the workforce, with automation poised to displace humans in the fields of medicine, agriculture, and beyond. Will the rise of robots fuel a new wave of “us versus them” populism capable of undermining democracy? 

Hearing Voices: For The Fallen

May 28, 2018
Troops salute a grave in a cemetery marked with crosses
NPR / Hearing Voices

Green Beret and poet, Colonel Robert Schaefer, US Army, hosts this 'Hearing Voices' Memorial Day special featuring the voices of veterans remembering their comrades: We talk with troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, reading their emails, poems, and journals, as part of the NEA project: “Operation Homecoming: Writing the Wartime Experience.” We hear interviews from StoryCorps, an essay from This I Believe, and the sounds of a Military Honor Guard, recorded by Charles Lane.

KGOU offers an hour-long public forum and debate over State Question 788. 

 Presented by Oklahoma Watch, the May 16th forum features Dr. Jean Hausheer, president of the Oklahoma State Medical Associtation; Frank Grove, chairman of Vote Yes on 788 and president of the Drug Policy Reform Network of Oklahoma; and Rep. John Paul Jordan.    

FOI Oklahoma

Freedom Of Information Oklahoma, a non-profit organization formed to promote openness in government, held a 2-hour 2018 gubernatorial candidate debate April 28, 2018. The event took place on the University of Central Oklahoma campus and was presented in partnership with UCentral Media and UCO Mass Communication Department. 

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