KGOU

2018 election

KGOU/Oklahoma Engaged

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Public radio stations KGOU, KOSU, KCCU and KWGS have now concluded our collaborative Oklahoma Engaged election reporting project, which received a regional Edward R. Murrow Award for Excellence in Innovation.

Oklahoma Republican candidate for Governor, Kevin Stitt, answers a question during a debate with Democratic candidate Drew Edmondson in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018.
Sue Ogracki / AP Photo

In the last of three interviews with each of Oklahoma's gubernatorial candidates, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley speak with Republican Kevin Stitt. Stitt discusses why he believes his business experience will help Oklahoma improve in areas like education, criminal justice and healthcare.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Elections have consequences, and on November 6th, voters across the nation have the opportunity to make their voices heard. Voting is a cherished right, and it’s important for everyone to be informed when they make their ballot decisions.

That’s why we’ve devoted several months to in-depth reporting on issues affecting Oklahomans through our collaborative journalism project, Oklahoma Engaged.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Drew Edmondson says if elected, he will make expanding Medicaid in the Sooner state a top priority.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

On a hot Monday afternoon, Zora Sampson stands behind rows of chairs set up in the lobby of the hospital in Pauls Valley. Sampson supports the Democratic candidate for Governor Drew Edmondson — and turned up to hear his plan to help rural hospitals. 

American currency
thinkpanama / Flickr Creative Commons

Political spending by secretive groups that are allowed to hide their donors have already spent what is likely a record amount this year to influence Oklahoma political races.

An Oklahoma Watch review of campaign finance records found so-called “dark money” groups had spent nearly $2.7 million on Oklahoma’s legislative, statewide and congressional races by the end of August.

Owner Sylvia Wilson, center, sits with a customer and an employee at Boots Cafe in Taft, Oklahoma.
Quinton Chandler / Oklahoma Engaged

If you follow your nose to the back of Boots Cafe, you’ll run into swinging wood doors hanging underneath a metal script sign of the word ‘Blessed.’

Ainsley Hoover, a teacher in Enid Public Schools, says the nine-day teacher walkout helped her realized that she has to stay politically engaged if she wants change.
Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

On the night of the primary elections, Ainsley Hoover was at a small watch party at the Chili’s restaurant in Enid. She had helped her friend, a fellow teacher, campaign for House District 41,  and they were anxiously awaiting the results.


This is the Manager’s Minute.

Tuesday, June 26th is primary election day across the state of Oklahoma.

Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m.

Interest in elections this year is high – with voting on state house and senate, statewide offices, congress, judges and more.

A state question regarding medical marijuana (SQ 788) is on the primary ballot.

This year, KGOU and our public radio partners will cover politics and elections through an innovative initiative – Oklahoma Engaged: Project Public Office.

Eric Haynes of Ada, Okla., says poorly maintained roads and sidewalks are among the biggest issues his community faces.
Caroline Halter / KGOU

Oklahoma voters will pick their primary candidates on June 26 and weigh in on a state question about legalizing medical marijuana. The political heat will build through the summer with high-profile endorsements, big-money ad blitzes and campaign promises.

Laura Knoll, KGOU

This is the Manager’s Minute.

We’re pleased to welcome a new member to the KGOU team.

Caroline Halter recently joined us as producer/reporter.

Caroline received her bachelor’s degree in International Relations from the University of Seattle.

She previously worked in public media in Marfa, Texas, and has covered politics and government in Alaska and Washington State.

Warren Vieth / Oklahoma Watch

The battle over Oklahoma’s tax on oil and gas production could soon spread outside the State Capitol to dinner conversations and public debates across the state.

A group of small oil and gas producers said despite recent efforts in the Legislature to raise the gross production tax temporarily to 7 percent on some wells, it will forge ahead with trying to put a state question on the 2018 ballot that would set a permanent 7 percent tax on all wells.