KGOU

2018 Midterm Elections

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor speaks with political scientist Dr. Keith Gaddie of the University of Oklahoma. The two dissect campaign activity leading up to the general election on Nov 6, including negative ads, push polls and the influx of dark money.

Caroline Halter / KGOU

John Carpenter is a yoga instructor in Choctaw. He previously worked as a probation officer, and before that he owned a construction company. And Carpenter recently organized his community’s opposition to the Eastern Oklahoma County Turnpike.

Christine Pappas is a professor and department chair of the Department of Political Science at East Central University in Ada, Oklahoma.
Caroline Halter / KGOU

The chair of the political science department at East Central University in Ada challenges her students to enroll their peer to vote.

“Instead of me an old person or some other professor asking a student to register if they're asked by a friend or a classmate they're much more likely to register,” Christine Pappas told KGOU’s Capitol Insider.

Koln Knight is the superintendent of Cushing Public Schools.
Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma education leaders say a state question designed to give districts more spending flexibility will do little to improve public schools’ financial difficulties.

Duncan optometrist Brendhan Fritts in an exam room at this practice.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

Brendhan Fritts’ optometry practice in Duncan is filled with brightly colored displays of models in designer glasses, pamphlets on the importance of routine eye care — and posters against State Question 793.

American currency
thinkpanama / Flickr Creative Commons

Political spending by secretive groups that are allowed to hide their donors have already spent what is likely a record amount this year to influence Oklahoma political races.

An Oklahoma Watch review of campaign finance records found so-called “dark money” groups had spent nearly $2.7 million on Oklahoma’s legislative, statewide and congressional races by the end of August.

Matt Pinnell, left, and Kevin Stitt talk to reporters at a watch party in Tulsa on Aug. 28, 2018.
Matt Trotter / Oklahoma Engaged

A political outsider will be the Republican party's nominee for governor.

Kevin Stitt, a Tulsa businessman, defeated former Oklahoma City mayor Mick Cornett in Tuesday's Republican primary runoff. Stitt defeated Cornett 55 to 45 percent. 

Edmond resident Jay Mandraccia casts her primary ballot during early voting Thursday at the Oklahoma County Board of Elections. Regular voting will be held Tuesday.
Trevor Brown / Oklahoma Watch

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss the high number of runoff races on Tuesday’s ballot, including the race between Republican gubernatorial candidates Kevin Stitt and Mick Cornett. 

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, Sooner Poll’s Bill Shapard joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to assess the Republican gubernatorial runoff and other races. Shapard also shares his thoughts on large numbers of undecided voters in the electorate and how people are waiting longer and longer to make decisions about candidates.

Oklahoma State University

Oklahoma State University political science professor Jeanette Mendez joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss her research on voter decision-making. Mendez explains that voters often use short-cuts called heuristics to make decisions about candidates, whether they realize it or not. The most common heuristics, according to Mendez, are political affiliation, gender and race.

 

FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Owner Sylvia Wilson, center, sits with a customer and an employee at Boots Cafe in Taft, Oklahoma.
Quinton Chandler / Oklahoma Engaged

If you follow your nose to the back of Boots Cafe, you’ll run into swinging wood doors hanging underneath a metal script sign of the word ‘Blessed.’

With Low Turnout, Should Oklahoma Kill The Primary Runoff?

Jul 18, 2018
A polling station at Oklahoma County Election Commission offices.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

August will be a pivotal month for Oklahoma politics, with likely a record number of candidates facing off in runoff primary elections.

Democratic candidates and supporters gather for a Democratic Unity picnic at the Wheeler Ferris Wheel grounds in Oklahoma City.
Kateleigh Mills / Oklahoma Engaged

Women are a key constituency for both of Oklahoma’s major political parties, and an increasing number of women are running for office. But data suggest a majority of Oklahoma women are disappointed with both major political parties.

Ryan LaCroix / Oklahoma Engaged

Long before the Tonight Show, late night TV icon Johnny Carson was hosted a game show entitled “Who Do You Trust?”

Former state Rep. Joe Dorman meets with voters on the University of Oklahoma campus during his 2014 campaign for governor.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

In this extended episode of Capitol Insider, former state representative and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial candidate Joe Dorman joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss what political candidates are up to following the June 26 primary election.

Former state Rep. Joe Dorman meets with voters on the University of Oklahoma campus during his 2014 campaign for governor.
Kate Carlton Greer / KGOU

 

In this episode of Capitol Insider, former state representative and 2014 Democratic gubernatorial nominee Joe Dorman joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss what political candidates are doing following the June 26 primary election. Dorman gives an insider perspective on day-to-day campaigning, local versus statewide strategies and the necessity of fundraising in today’s political system.

 

AP Photo/Bill Waugh

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley discuss what Todd Lamb’s loss means for the remaining gubernatorial candidates.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

 

On this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley assess the results of Oklahoma’s June 26, 2018 primary election.

Voters approved State Question 788, which will legalize medical marijuana, by 58 percent. And approximately 25,000 more people cast votes for 788 than did for the governor’s race.

Roy Lenz, a retired farmer, owns the Brandin’ Iron in Laverne, Oklahoma. His bar is in a dry county, so he can only serve low point beer.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Roy Lenz tidies the bar at the Brandin’ Iron on a Saturday afternoon. His wife, Barbara, fires up the grill, filling the place with the smell of hamburger patties, grilled onions and bacon.

“This place was built back in the late 20s, early 30s, and it’s been a bar from the late 30s, early 40s,” Roy said.

Voters cast ballots at the Oklahoma County Election Board Thursday, the first day of voting for the June 26 elections. The slate includes primary races for statewide offices and legislative seats, as well as State Question 788 on medical marijuana.
Jeff Raymond / Oklahoma Watch

Voters began casting early ballots Thursday, beginning the process to select a new governor, fill most statewide offices and legislative seats, and decide the controversial ballot question on medical marijuana.

Pages