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2018 Midterm Elections

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The 2018 midterm elections in Oklahoma confirmed hardened geographic divisions. The state's two largest metro areas favored Democrats, while rural Oklahoma voted overwhelmingly Republican. But rural counties are losing population, overall demographics are changing and redistricting is on the horizon. 

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This is the Manager’s Minute.

Now that the Oklahoma elections are over, let’s recap what we’ve done so far in the collaborative journalism project, Oklahoma Engaged. With funding from the Ethics & Excellence in Journalism Foundation and the Kirkpatrick Foundation:

Dr. Allyson Shortle (left) stands with students and Gov. Mary Fallin on election day, Nov. 6, 2018, when they conducted exit polling in Oklahoma County.
Lauren Capraro / University of Oklahoma Department of Political Science

In this episode of Capitol Insider, Dr. Allyson Shortle, a professor of political science at the University of Oklahoma, joins KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley to discuss exit polling she conducted on election day in Oklahoma County. Shortle's preliminary results indicate why voters--especially swing voters--in Oklahoma's most populous county chose Democrats this year. 

FULL TRANSCRIPT: 

Ajay Pittman

There won’t be any major partisan shifts in the makeup of the Oklahoma legislature following the 2018 election. But, the gender balance has changed--more women were elected to the Oklahoma House and Senate on Tuesday.

Cyndi Ralston, a second grade teacher running as a Democrat for House District 12, concedes to her opponent.
Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

It’s about 9 p.m. in Coweta, a rural town south east of Tulsa.

The election results are still trickling in as Cyndi Ralston, a second-grade teacher -turned Democratic political candidate, steps on to the stage in the small event space where she’s having her watch party.

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Oklahoma, gestures as he speaks during a Town Hall meeting in Moore, Okla., Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Despite a Democrat victory for Kendra Horn in Oklahoma Tuesday, the state’s delegation will have to rely on bipartisan solutions and potential compromise to maintain influence in a newly Democratic House of Representatives.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley are joined by Bryan Dean of the Oklahoma State Election Board. The three discuss new voter registration numbers, election security, expanding, early voting and whether you can snap a selfie with your ballot. 

  FULL TRANSCRIPT:

Oklahoma Engaged

Oklahoma voters face five state questions when they vote this month. While this election’s state questions are not as high profile as recent ballot proposals on medical marijuana and alcohol law changes, they do present some meaningful changes in specific areas.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Caroline Halter/KGOU

Oklahoma Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-OK, is not up for reelection this year, but he visited Tulsa on Nov. 1 to talk about an issue that has resurfaced in the weeks leading up to the 2018 midterm election: immigration. Speaking at a press conference, Inhofe announced his plan to fund a wall along the U.S. Mexico border by eliminating public benefits for immigrants without work-authorized Social Security numbers.

 

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KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley spoke with all three Oklahoma gubernatorial candidates on Capitol Insider about where each stands on our state’s biggest issues like worsening teacher shortages, tax policy, government transparency, exemptions for childhood vaccinations, carrying out the death penalty and more.

Listen to our in-depth conversations with Libertarian Chris Powell, Democrat Drew Edmondson and Republican Kevin Stitt below.

Ada resident Roland Boggs says he supports Democratic district attorney hopeful Josh Edwards.
Quinton Chandler / StateImpact Oklahoma

Integrity, experience and a plan for change are the keys to some voters’ support in Hughes, Pontotoc and Seminole counties, which are all represented by the same district attorney’s office.

Oklahoma Republican candidate for Governor, Kevin Stitt, answers a question during a debate with Democratic candidate Drew Edmondson in Oklahoma City, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018.
Sue Ogracki / AP Photo

In the last of three interviews with each of Oklahoma's gubernatorial candidates, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley speak with Republican Kevin Stitt. Stitt discusses why he believes his business experience will help Oklahoma improve in areas like education, criminal justice and healthcare.

FULL TRANSCRIPT

Education is a top focus for many voters. Others, like Jason Retherford, a youth and family minister from Duncan, worry about the lack of economic opportunity. A poll found 57 percent of Oklahomans say jobs and economy are the main problems for families.
Emily Wendler / StateImpact Oklahoma

If Daryl Fisher, a supervisor at a group home for young men, could fix one thing in Oklahoma, it would be education.

“Everybody always focuses on kids,” he said in an interview at a gas station in downtown Oklahoma City. “But are we really focusing on kids when we’re opening up more jails, trying to make more room, and not educating them? Are we really focusing on them?”

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Elections have consequences, and on November 6th, voters across the nation have the opportunity to make their voices heard. Voting is a cherished right, and it’s important for everyone to be informed when they make their ballot decisions.

That’s why we’ve devoted several months to in-depth reporting on issues affecting Oklahomans through our collaborative journalism project, Oklahoma Engaged.

Caroline Halter/KGOU

In the second of three interviews with each of Oklahoma's gubernatorial candidates, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley speak with Democrat Drew Edmondson.  Edmondson discusses his decision to run for governor a second time and lays out his positions on key issues like taxes, the death penalty, healthcare, abortion and education policy. 

  FULL TRANSCRIPT:

A billboard advertises the services of Cordell Memorial Hospital’s only doctor and two nurse practitioners.
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

As the 2018 election season hits a fever pitch in Oklahoma, residents across the state are scrutinizing the credentials of the candidates. And with November 6 just three weeks away, some new political concerns are coming to light.

Caroline Halter/KGOU

In the first of three interviews with each of Oklahoma's gubernatorial candidates, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley speak with Libertarian Chris Powell. Powell explains his party's philosophy and lays out his positions on key issues like taxes, recreational marijuana, healthcare, abortion and education policy. 

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor speaks with political scientist Dr. Keith Gaddie of the University of Oklahoma. The two dissect campaign activity leading up to the general election on Nov 6, including negative ads, push polls and the influx of dark money.

Caroline Halter / KGOU

John Carpenter is a yoga instructor in Choctaw. He previously worked as a probation officer, and before that he owned a construction company. And Carpenter recently organized his community’s opposition to the Eastern Oklahoma County Turnpike.

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