KGOU

Alan McPherson

University of Central Oklahoma student Raul Reyes.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

 

University of Central Oklahoma student Raul Reyes sits at a piano in the practice room of the School of Music, his fingers gliding across the keys as he plays “Yolanda,” by Cuban composer Pablo Milanés.

“This song is very popular, but I don’t know if it is very popular here in the States,” Reyes said. “It’s slow, soft music. This song is really famous in Cuba, and probably in South America.”

World Views: March 25, 2016

Mar 25, 2016

Mateo Mohammad Farzaneh studies and teaches Iranian history at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago. He's just written a book about the country’s early 20th century constitutional revolution.

But first, Rebecca Cruise and University of Oklahoma Latin American Studies professor Alan McPherson discuss President Obama’s historic trip to Cuba and Argentina.

Argentina's president Mauricio Macri chats with the President Obama during his visit to Argentina on March 23, 2016.
Casa Rosada / (CC BY 2.5 AR)

President Obama made a historic trip to Cuba this week – the first by a sitting U.S. president since Calvin Coolidge visited the island nation 88 years ago.

Obama said he wanted the trip to signify the end of the Cold War in Latin America. The 44th president wasn’t even born yet when Congress enacted a trade embargo after the Fidel Castro-led communist takeover in 1959.

U2 performing on one of their concerts of the 360° tour in Gelsenkirchen, Germany on August 3, 2009.
SteBo / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Rock music and charity have gone hand-in-hand for decades.

Former Beatle George Harrison organized the Concert for Bangladesh in 1971 to raise money and awareness of genocide after the country’s war for independence. Queen Elizabeth knighted The Boomtown Rats’ front man Bob Geldof for organizing the 1985 Live Aid concerts that spanned two continents, and Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp, and Neil Young followed suit for American family farmers. After 9/11, dozens of groups gathered in Madison Square Garden for 2001’s Concert for New York City.

World Views: January 16, 2015

Jan 16, 2015

University of Oklahoma Latin America historian Alan McPherson joins Suzette Grillot for a conversation about what the lifting of trade and travel restrictions could mean for U.S.-Cuban relations.

Then a conversation with Boston University scholar David Collier. Sixty-five years ago Iran unsuccessfully experimented with democracy, and he argues the Islamic Republic can build on this legacy. 

World Views: June 27, 2014

Jun 27, 2014

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the North Korean response to the Seth Rogen and James Franco film The Interview, and the report released this week  reviewing the increased use of drones by the United States.

And a conversation with University of Oklahoma Latin America historian Alan McPherson. His new book The Invaded explores early 20th century conflicts in Nicaragua, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic.

A.R. Harrison / United States Marine Corps

Eighty years after President James Monroe announced his opposition to any European intervention in Latin America, President Theodore Roosevelt expanded on the idea and justified the United States’ aggressive pursuit of its own economic and political interests in the region during his 1904 State of the Union address.

World Views: September 27, 2013

Sep 27, 2013

Over the last decade, the foreign-born population in Mexico has nearly doubled, and the country is turning into an immigrant destination. Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma Latin America scholar Alan McPherson about the new dynamics of migration in our southern neighbor.

Later, a conversation with environmental journalist Emma Marris. She writes about “assisted migration” - deliberately helping plants and animals colonize new habitats.

Sam Beebe / Flickr Creative Commons

Over the last decade, the foreign-born population in Mexico has nearly doubled, and the country is turning into an immigrant destination – especially for American citizens.

The New York Times reported Sunday that International Monetary Fund data shows Mexico’s economy outpaced the United States, Canada and Brazil in 2011 and 2012.

University of Oklahoma International and Area Studies Professor Alan McPherson is an expert on U.S.-Latin America relations. He says Mexico’s economy is more diverse than it’s ever been, but there’s a downside to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and other aspects of globalization.