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cannabis

A woman stands in a hemp field at a farm in Springfield, Colo.
AP Photo/P. Solomon Banda

The demand for licenses to grow hemp has exceeded state officials' expectations. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses  profitable aspects of the hemp industry and how Oklahoma hopes to model its certification program on states like Colorado. 

A bottle of Charlotte’s Web cannabidiol oil.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Last year, Oklahoma lawmakers approved a medical treatment for severe childhood seizures that used part of the cannabis plant. Another piece of legislation that would widely expand the law is close to Gov. Mary Fallin’s desk.

Oklahoma House of Representatives

Gov. Mary Fallin's desk is the next stop for legislation that authorizes an investigational study into clinical trials on certain patients with severe forms of epilepsy using an oil derived from the marijuana plant.

The Oklahoma House voted 85-5 for the measure and sent it to Fallin to be signed into law. Fallin has expressed support for the idea but says she remains opposed to legalizing all medical marijuana applications.

Peazo Cogollo / Flickr.com

Colorado's attorney general says the Nebraska and Oklahoma lawsuit that asks the U.S. Supreme court to curtail Colorado's new recreational marijuana law could have dire consequences for all three states.

Attorney General Cynthia Coffman says if the U.S. Supreme Court sides with the two states that border Colorado, the decision would take away the regulatory system that Colorado has built, while leaving the vote to legalize marijuana intact.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

Nebraska and Oklahoma are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to declare Colorado's legalization of marijuana unconstitutional.

Nebraska Attorney General Jon Bruning announced Thursday that the states are seeking a court order to prevent Colorado from enforcing a measure that was approved by voters in 2012. Bruning says Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt is also a party to the lawsuit.

The complaint alleges that Colorado's Amendment 64 runs afoul of federal law.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

In a joint interim study on Monday regarding the use of Cannabinoid (CBD) extract for the treatment of severe seizure disorders, Rep. Jon Echols, R-Oklahoma City, stated that he expects to propose legislation in the upcoming session to allow for medical trials of non-intoxicating CBD with low Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) levels. 

Pediatric Neurologist Dr. Amy Stauffer stated that there are no good human studies as of yet, though some animal models have shown a positive effect.

Oklahoma will now exclude cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating chemical found in marijuana, from its definition of the drug.
Dank Depot / Flickr Creative Commons

A group that supports the use of medical marijuana in Oklahoma plans to submit signed petitions to the Oklahoma Secretary of State's office to have the issue placed on the November ballot.

Tulsa-based Oklahomans for Health plans to submit the petitions on Friday. The group faces a Saturday deadline to gather the signatures of more than 155,000 registered Oklahoma voters who support a referendum on the issue.