KGOU

Chad Wilkerson

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College graduates are leaving Oklahoma at higher rates than any other demographic group according to the Kansas City Federal Reserve. New research shows the state lost a record number of college graduates from 2013 to 2017.

 

Oklahoma’s population growth rate is at its lowest since 1990 according to new study from the Kansas City Federal Reserve. That’s because Oklahoma lost more residents to other states than it gained over the past three years, with college graduates leading the way.

Robert Dauffenback

Oklahoma’s economy tracks closely with the price of oil, which has risen significantly since the 2014 downturn. In this episode of Capitol Insider, Bob Dauffenbach, the Senior Associate Dean for Economic Development and Impact at the University of Oklahoma, joins KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley to discuss the state’s economic outlook. Dauffenbach also offers his thoughts on what policymakers should be doing to harness the state's economic growth.

 

 FULL TRANSCRIPT:

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Following the 2014-16 oil bust, Oklahoma’s oil production reached new heights. But gains in employment haven’t kept pace. The state’s oil and gas industry employs 20 percent fewer people than it did at the height of production last year, according to a new analysis by the Kansas City Federal Reserve.