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Oklahoma state Rep. Jason Lowe, D-Oklahoma City, speaks to reporters Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, about plans to seek a public vote on whether to reject the state's new permitless carry law.
Sean Murphy / AP Photo

Supporters of a petition drive to repeal Oklahoma's permitless carry law fell about 22,000 signatures short of their goal. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss what happens when the law takes effect November 1, as well as the new Department of Health Commissioner and pay raises at the Department of Human Services.

Pixabay

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss a last minute effort to repeal Oklahoma's newest gun law and more. 

Gun Deaths In Oklahoma: Trends, Laws And Survival

Aug 6, 2019
A glimpse from 2016 into a bucketful of confiscated guns in the Oklahoma City Police Department’s property room.
Michael Willmus

Mass shootings in Texas and Ohio over the weekend have put gun deaths and firearm laws back in the spotlight.

Oklahoma’s last major mass shooting event was in 1986, when 14 people were killed at an Edmond post office. But the state’s death rate from guns used in both suicide and homicide has been rising and a major loosening of gun regulations is upon us when the state’s new “permitless carry” law goes into effect Nov. 1.

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Feb. 28 was the first major deadline since the the 2019 Oklahoma legislative session convened. In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss bills gaining traction at the state capitol, as well as one piece of legislation that has already been signed by Gov. Kevin Stitt. 

Dick Pryor/KGOU

In this episode of Capitol Insider, Senate President Pro Tempore Greg Treat speaks with Dick Pryor about the most pressing issues facing the legislature during the 2019 session, including retaining Oklahoma teachers, gun laws and state revenue. This is the first of a two part interview. 

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

Before adjourning the 2018 Legislative Session on May 3, Oklahoma lawmakers passed a number of bills that could face legal challenges or vetoes from Gov. Mary Fallin.

 

 


Lawmakers passed Senate Bill 1140, a bill allowing private adoption agencies that contract with the state to act in accordance with their “written religious or moral convictions or policies.” The bill includes language prohibiting the agencies from violating federal and state law, but it’s unlikely to evade legal challenges, according to eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley.

 

Rod Waddington / Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0StateImpact Oklahoma

A bill that would allow Oklahomans to carry firearms in public without getting permission from the state is on Gov. Mary Fallin’s desk.

State senators gave Senate Bill 1212 their final approval late Wednesday night on a measure that allows gun owners to carry their firearms openly or hidden from view without a permit, passing state background checks or paying the related fees. They also won’t have to take 16 hours of firearms safety training currently required before carrying a gun in public.