COVID-19 | KGOU
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COVID-19

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This is the Manager’s Minute.

An essential element of our work at KGOU involves delivering news and information to help each person become a better educated citizen. That’s especially important now – an election year when the global pandemic and economic turmoil are affecting all of us. 

 

official state portrait
State Department of Education

Oklahoma school districts are nearing time to welcome students back for classes. The pressure is building for students to return to the classroom, but the COVID-19 pandemic has forced a reevaluation of teaching methods and how to keep students, staff and teachers safe. State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister discussed the critical issues involved and how Oklahoma schools are planning to operate during the fall with KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley.

The “Die-In and Drive Up Protest” attracted University of Oklahoma faculty and staff, alumni and students to protest at Headington Hall the possible dangers of reopening the campus for in person instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic.
Katelyn Howard

A protest against the possible dangers of reopening the University of Oklahoma’s campus for in person instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic took place Tuesday outside of the OU Board of Regents meeting. 

Oklahoma State Department of Health

With coronavirus surging across the U.S. and the number of cases growing in Oklahoma, interim Commissioner of Health Colonel Lance Frye discussed the current situation in the state with KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley.

Oklahoma State Department of Health

The state of Oklahoma and three Native American tribes have signalled cooperation after the U.S. Supreme Court decision in McGirt v. Oklahoma raised concerns about jurisdiction for enforcement of criminal laws. Details still have to be worked out, but the move is a step toward a negotiated settlement. The news was not so encouraging regarding COVID-19 in the state. As schools work toward opening in the fall, coronavirus cases surge and the state's economic "re-opening" is called into question. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the latest developments. 

Walton Family Foundation

This is the Manager’s Minute.

 

KGOU, StateImpact Oklahoma and our public radio partners are ramping up efforts to report on the 2020 elections through Oklahoma Engaged. 

Norman City Council members adopted an ordinance mandating face coverings. The council passed the ordinance 8 - 1 during a special session over Zoom videoconference on July 7, 2020.
SCREENSHOT

The Norman City Council adopted an ordinance Tuesday that mandates the use of face coverings in an effort to control the spread of COVID-19.

Oklahoma Watch

On June 30th, Oklahoma voters narrowly passed State Question 802 to expand Medicaid in the state. The vote not only placed the issue in the state Constitution, but gave an indication of the Oklahoma political landscape in the 2020 election year. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the fallout of the 802 vote in the latest Capitol Insider.

In 2018, 88 Oklahomans were killed by domestic abusers.
Courtesy of the Oklahoma Domestic Violence Fatality Review Board

The novel coronavirus is a germy wrench stuck in the gears of domestic violence advocacy programs across the state.

Measures taken to escape Covid-19 have made it harder for some domestic violence victims to find safety from their abusers. Victim advocates also fear they may experience more severe violence in their isolation.

KGOU

Normally, this would be the time of year when many Oklahomans hit the road to enjoy the outdoors or beat the heat. Certainly, they would be making plans for celebrating Independence Day. This year, however, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused most people to reevaluate their social plans, and forced the state of Oklahoma to adjust its strategy for rolling out a new brand to encourage business development and tourism. Lieutenant Governor Matt Pinnell discussed the "Imagine That" campaign and the impact of coronavirus on the state with KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley in the latest Capitol Insider.

A picture of Quartz Mountain with the Oklahoma Arts Institute logo. The institute was forced to move online by the coronavirus.
Courtesy Oklahoma Arts Institute

Maida Escobar was hesitant to attend the Oklahoma Arts Institute this summer.

She had so many questions about how the state’s premier arts program for high school students could go online.

“I was like how is that gonna work?” the Muskogee High School student said. “Should I even do it? Is it gonna be the same?”

State of Oklahoma

Oklahoma voters go to the polls on June 30 under some new rules and recommendations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley talk to Oklahoma State Election Board Secretary Paul Ziriax about absentee voting and what to expect on election day for the Oklahoma Primary Election.

Photo Courtesy Jobs For Felons Hub

Staff inside the Comanche County Detention Center knew they had a problem when the number of prisoners infected with Covid-19 reached 18 in early May.

Oklahoma Event Organizers Consider Options As State Tries To Reopen

May 13, 2020
Oklahoma City Thunder fans watch a live broadcast in Thunder Alley outside Chesapeake Energy Arena in this Journal Record file photo.
The Journal Record

As Oklahoma navigates plans to reopen slowly, event organizers must decide whether to hold their functions in person, move them online or cancel altogether. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses how some of the state's most beloved occasions could change in the wake of COVID-19. 

Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein believes it's unlikely there have only been two Oklahoma prisoners infected with COVID-19.
Courtesy Lauren Brinkley-Rubinstein

Jonna Wolf is worried there are a lot more than the two COVID-19 cases being reported in Oklahoma’s population of nearly 24,000 prisoners.

Her fiancé, Griffin Davison, is finishing up a five-year prison term for convictions stemming from possession of marijuana with intent to distribute. He has less than a year left.

Lawsuits Likely As Businesses Reopen

May 6, 2020
Suzanne Hutton cleans her barber’s chair between clients at The Barber Shop in Broken Arrow on April 24.
(Matt Barnard/Tulsa World via AP)

As Oklahoma and other states begin to reopen slowly, attorneys say businesses will likely face liability lawsuits related to COVID-19. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses how litigation costs could devastate small businesses. 

Chris Landsberger / The Oklahoman

Oklahoma is one of more than 30 states making the decision to partially reopen May 1 after weeks of stay-at-home or safer-at-home orders meant to keep the coronavirus pandemic from overwhelming healthcare systems. Slowing the curve of COVID-19 infections and deaths has come at a profound economic cost, however, with 30 million workers across the country filing for unemployment benefits since mid-March.

 

This is the Manager’s Minute. I’m Dick Pryor. 

 

COVID-19 has separated us from friends and loved ones and changed our daily lives. It doesn’t affect everybody the same way, but this crisis has also pulled people closer together.  

Legislative Service Bureau (LSB) Photography

With the state of Oklahoma "opening up," Governor Kevin Stitt, the Oklahoma Supreme Court and legislators address issues caused by the coronavirus pandemic. As lawmakers prepare to return to the Capitol for the final month of the session, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the latest developments in state government. 

KGOU

Governor Kevin Stitt moves forward with a plan to do a phased-in re-opening of private businesses in Oklahoma following several weeks of closure due to COVID-19. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the plan and the latest developments in a dispute over new tribal gaming compacts.

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