KGOU

Donald Trump

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

 

Kendra Horn represents Oklahoma’s fifth congressional district, and she is one of a small group of Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives who does not support the impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s relations with Ukraine.

CDC director Robert Redfield touring the Infectious Diseases Institute at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in Oklahoma City. The institute is one of two federally funded HIV clinics in Oklahoma; the other is in Tulsa, the state’s second-l
Jackie Fortier / StateImpact Oklahoma

Oklahoma may soon see more money to help fight the AIDS epidemic. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently visited health care facilities that offer treatment in Oklahoma, one of seven states where the rural transmission of HIV is exceptionally high.

Dr. Allyson Shortle (left) stands with students and Gov. Mary Fallin on election day, Nov. 6, 2018, when they conducted exit polling in Oklahoma County.
Lauren Capraro / University of Oklahoma Department of Political Science

In this episode of Capitol Insider, Dr. Allyson Shortle, a professor of political science at the University of Oklahoma, joins KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley to discuss exit polling she conducted on election day in Oklahoma County. Shortle's preliminary results indicate why voters--especially swing voters--in Oklahoma's most populous county chose Democrats this year. 

FULL TRANSCRIPT: 

U.S. President Donald Trump and China's President Xi Jinping arrive for the state dinner with the first ladies at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017.
Thomas Peter / Pool Photo via AP

The relationship between China and the United States is difficult, but there is a chance for a harmonious path forward.

Reveal: Follow The Money

Aug 28, 2017
How much is President Donald Trump worth? And is he or anyone in his administration profiting from their positions? Reveal is teaming up with the Center for Public Integrity to investigate those questions.
Michael Schiller / Reveal

Update, Aug. 26, 2017: On this episode of Reveal, we introduce #citizensleuth – a collaboration with the Center for Public Integrity. The project aims to answer questions such as “How much is President Donald Trump worth?” or “Is he or anyone in his administration profiting from their positions?”  We’ve created a database listing all the assets that members of his administration have disclosed and we’re asking the public to take part in our investigation.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Almost 48 hours after violence engulfed Charlottesville, Va., President Trump called out white nationalist groups by name. Trump's remarks on Monday followed criticism that his initial statement about the clash of protesters did not condemn racist groups specifically.

White House senior adviser Jared Kushner speaks to reporters outside the White House in Washington, Monday, July 24, 2017.
Alex Brandon / AP

Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser, told lawmakers in a statement on Monday that he "did not collude... with any foreign government."

A conservative political consultant was on the payroll of the Trump 2020 re-election campaign this spring, while also defending the president in political commentary on the Fox Business Network.

Andrew Harnik / AP Images

Christopher Wray, President Trump’s nominee for FBI Director, faces the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday for his confirmation hearing. Wray would replace James Comey, whom Trump fired in May. Wray served in the Justice Department under President George W. Bush and currently works on white-collar crime at an international law firm. Given Comey's dismissal and ongoing investigations into Russian interference in the U.S. election and potential ties to the Trump campaign, senators are expected to press Wray on his independence and integrity.

Donald Trump Jr. tweeted images of emails regarding his 2016 meeting with a Russian lawyer on Tuesday. An intermediary said he could connect Trump Jr. with people who had information "that would incriminate Hillary [Clinton]... and would be very useful to your father." Trump Jr. agreed to the meeting, which former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Trump son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner also attended in June 2016.

U.S. Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Oklahoma, promoted investment in infrastructure in a day-long tour that included a stop at the Frederick Regional Airport.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

A cornerstone of President Trump’s campaign and presidency is a $1 trillion proposal to rebuild U.S. infrastructure. The promise is a popular one, and could find bipartisan support across the country and in Congress. The infrastructure needs in Oklahoma illustrate why this issue is so appealing — and challenging.

In this screenshot taken from the live video, former FBI Director James Comey listens to questions during a hearing before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence June 8, 2017.
NPR

Former FBI Director James Comey is testifying before the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence this week, speaking publicly for the first time since he was fired by President Trump nearly a month ago. The Senate Committee is looking into the circumstances around Comey's dismissal and how they relate to the FBI investigation of Russian interference in the U.S. Election.

One of the more baffling cultural intersections to take place during President Trump's first overseas trip was a concert that took place Saturday night in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It featured American country music star Toby Keith, who performed for an all-male audience.

Jerry Laizure / AP Images

Former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating is among the candidates to replace James Comey as the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Republicans in Congress are calling for briefings and pleading for "less drama" at the White House following revelations that President Trump shared classified intelligence with Russia — but most are muted in their criticism of him.

For the leader of Senate Republicans, the biggest concern is that the controversy over Trump's sharing of secrets — with the successor to what Republican President Ronald Reagan once labeled the "evil empire" — is that it's distracting lawmakers from their legislative program.

Mandel Ngan / AFP/Getty Images

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday relaxing political restrictions on religious groups. Among other provisions, Trump directs the IRS to ease up on faith-based organizations who may have had their tax-exempt status threatened for supporting a particular candidate. NPR reporters annotate the order, adding context and analysis.

illustration of report card with checkmarks
Chelsea Beck / NPR

Before his election, back in October, then-presidential candidate Donald Trump laid out a 100 Day Action Plan. He called it his Contract With The American Voter. Among other things, it called for the full repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, suspension of immigration from certain "terror-prone regions," and the lifting of "roadblocks" to let "infrastructure projects like the Keystone Pipeline move forward."

Updated at 9:48 p.m. ET

The White House issued an ultimatum to House Republicans on Thursday: Vote for the current GOP health care replacement plan or leave the Affordable Care Act in place and suffer the political consequences.

President Trump salutes a uniformed serviceman
Getty Images

President Trump has signed a revised executive order, once again barring travel to the United States from six majority-Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program. It's similar to the president's January order that was blocked by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. But this latest order leaves Iraq off the list of barred countries. The White House cites more cooperation with the Iraqi government in vetting people who apply for U.S. visas. The latest order also specifically states that it does not apply to legal permanent U.S. residents or current visa holders.

Storme Jones / KGOU

 

Oklahomans rallied at the State Capitol Saturday as part of a nationwide effort called March 4 Trump.

 

State Sen. Ervin Yen, R-Oklahoma City, spoke at the event and said Trump hasn’t had a chance to begin governing yet.

 

“Donald Trump is my president. Let’s give him a chance. Let’s stop bashing him,” Yen said. “The administration that he has put together, I think there are some really sharp people in there. Let’s see what happens”

 

Pages