governor kevin stitt | KGOU
KGOU

governor kevin stitt

Now that they have been sworn into office, the members of Oklahoma's next legislature are focusing on getting ready for the session that begins in February. In this week's Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley talk about the work that lies ahead.

Norman Mayor Breea Clark, right, listens during a city council meeting Tuesday, June 9, 2020 in Norman, Okla. An effort to recall Clark and some council members is underway.
Sue Ogrocki / AP Photo

The Norman City Council voted Tuesday to extend the city’s mask mandate as COVID-19 cases continue to rise across the state. The original ordinance was set to expire on Nov. 30, but the council voted unanimously to extend it to March 1.   

In this July 9, 2020 file photo, Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt speaks during a news conference in Oklahoma City. Stitt, the first governor in the nation to test positive for the coronavirus, says he has donated plasma to help other virus patients recover.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Coronavirus again dominated news coming out of Oklahoma's state capitol, as Governor Kevin Stitt pointed to positive trends in the state and questioned data being used by the Trump Administration's Coronavirus Task Force. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the latest on the state of Oklahoma's COVID-19 response in this week's Capitol Insider.

NIAID Coronavirus Prevention Network/National Institute of Health

Like much of the rest of the nation, Oklahoma is still trying to manage the spread of coronavirus. While deaths remain relatively low, White House metrics show the Oklahoma trend line is among the most troubling in the nation. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the latest numbers and how COVID-19 is affecting the state's prison population.

NIAID Coronavirus Prevention Network/National Institute of Health

Beginning in late June and continuing for several weeks, the White House Coronavirus Task Force warned state leaders that Oklahoma was in the "red zone" for coronavirus transmission. However, despite growing urgency from the White House for the state to adopt new, stricter policies, the recommendations have been largely ignored.  

State of Oklahoma

Although the legality will likely be questioned, the state of Oklahoma has entered into compacts with two more Native American tribes. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss that story and the latest on the state's coronavirus response as schools prepare to open, in the latest Capitol Insider.

Oklahoma State Department of Health

The state of Oklahoma and three Native American tribes have signalled cooperation after the U.S. Supreme Court decision in McGirt v. Oklahoma raised concerns about jurisdiction for enforcement of criminal laws. Details still have to be worked out, but the move is a step toward a negotiated settlement. The news was not so encouraging regarding COVID-19 in the state. As schools work toward opening in the fall, coronavirus cases surge and the state's economic "re-opening" is called into question. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the latest developments. 

Oklahoma Capitol Restoration Project

With the 2020 legislative session now over, lawmakers are refocusing on the upcoming elections and issues relevant in the year ahead. Meanwhile, the work of the Oklahoma Capitol Restoration Project moves to the vacant House and Senate chambers. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley take one last look at the session and its effect on the months to come.

Legislative Service Bureau (LSB) Photography

The most unusual legislative session in the history of Oklahoma is now over. Legislators welcomed Sine Die Adjournment at 5:00 p.m. on Friday, May 29, although they had actually finished their work one week before. By law, the legislature must end the regular session by 5:00 p.m. on the last Friday in May, which they did, but this year the gavel fell without lawmakers in their chambers. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley look back at the session that will always be defined by COVID-19.

A week after sending its final bills of the legislative session to Governor Kevin Stitt for his consideration, Oklahoma lawmakers returned to the Capitol on Friday with vetoes on their minds. Six gubernatorial vetoes, to be exact. In short, breathtaking fashion, the legislature overrode vetoes on six bills the governor had vetoed just a few days before. The action came fast, even though the legislature is not legally required to conclude its work for another week, on the last Friday of May. 

Legislative Service Bureau (LSB) Photography

With the state of Oklahoma "opening up," Governor Kevin Stitt, the Oklahoma Supreme Court and legislators address issues caused by the coronavirus pandemic. As lawmakers prepare to return to the Capitol for the final month of the session, KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the latest developments in state government. 

KGOU

After a two week impasse, the Board of Equalization is prepared to meet to address the State of Oklahoma's current year revenue failure. This comes as legislators seek to craft the next state budget and Governor Kevin Stitt looks at ways to restart the state's economy. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley discuss the latest news from under the dome. 

Legislative Service Bureau (LSB) Photography

Legislators returned to work at the state Capitol with new policies and procedures to protect members and staff from the COVID-19 virus. News of a current budget year revenue failure dominated the regular and special session, while a disagreement with Governor Stitt delayed the approval process. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discussed the eventful week under the dome. 

As the State of Oklahoma works to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Kevin Stitt calls lawmakers back to the Capitol for a special session to consider emergency procedures and the state's budget problems. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the extraordinary measures facing state leaders.

NIH.gov

Governor Kevin Stitt has again amended the list of businesses in Oklahoma that are considered essential during the COVID-19 pandemic. Meanwhile, state agencies and the legislature are continuing to work outside their offices and practicing social distancing. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the recent developments at the state Capitol.

niaid.nih.gov

As the 2020 session heads toward a Spring Break-shortened week, concerns are rising about the COVID-19 outbreak. Governor Kevin Stitt announced the state of Oklahoma's initial approach and House and Senate leaders are considering contingency plans. eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley discusses this rapidly-moving story with KGOU's Dick Pryor.

Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

The weather-shortened first week of the 2020 Legislative Session is over. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss state agency changes that were front and center in Governor Stitt's State of the State address.

Feb. 3, 2020
Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

As the 2020 Oklahoma Legislative Session begins, Governor Kevin Stitt delivers his State of the State Address and releases his Executive Budget. KGOU News presents the full speech and KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the major themes and expectations for the 2020 session.

KGOU - Dick Pryor

Money is coming into the state of Oklahoma from tribal gaming in December, but what to do with exclusivity fee payments from January is up in the air. eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley tells Dick Pryor the governor's office is researching the issue.

KGOU - Dick Pryor

As lawmakers await state revenue figures from the Board of Equalization, state agencies are preparing budget requests, with a little help.

Pages