KGOU

Indigenous Peoples' Day

Sarah Adams-Cornell holds the Mayor's proclamation that declares October 8 Indigenous Peoples Day in Oklahoma City.
Caroline Halter / KGOU

Sarah Adams-Cornell, a citizen of Choctaw Nation, is one many activists who has worked for over three years to get Indigenous Peoples' Day officially recognized in Oklahoma City.

“It helps to solidify our sovereignty as indigenous people,” Adams-Cornell said. She’s part of a group called Live Indigenous OK.

Assignment: Radio - October 18, 2015

Oct 18, 2015
Wikimedia

This is the semester's first episode of Assignment: Radio, KGOU's student-produced public affairs program focusing on issues and events on the University of Oklahoma campus.

This week the Assignment Radio reporters talk to three Oklahoma women showing strength in unique ways.

First, Patrick Smith looks into the work of Parents Helping Parents, a local support group for people with children facing challenges. He talks to a woman who was helped by her involvement in the group.

University of Oklahoma President David Boren announces the first Indigenous Peoples' Day October 12, 2015 outside the Bizzell Memorial Library on the south end of campus.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Native American students and University of Oklahoma administrators marked the first annual Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday morning. The ceremony came after the Undergraduate Student Congress passed a resolution last month recognizing the holiday in place of Columbus Day.

Dozens of students and faculty participated in a tribal flag procession down the main thoroughfare on OU’s campus as drums beat and dancers marched toward the library.

Native American students and school administrators march down the South Oval toward Bizzell Memorial Library October 12, 2015 morning to mark the first Indigenous Peoples' Day at the University of Oklahoma.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Late last month, after extended discussion, the University of Oklahoma Student Congress officially recognized Indigenous Peoples' Day in place of Columbus Day on campus. The vote was a victory for its sponsors, Indigenize OU, a group of four Native American student activists.