KGOU

ISIS

World Views: November 4, 2016

Nov 4, 2016

University of Oklahoma Vice President for Weather and Climate Programs, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences Dean, and National Weather Center director Berrien Moore talks with Suzette Grillot about his involvement with last year’s Paris Climate Conference, and some of the domestic politics surrounding climate change.

But first, Joshua Landis provides an update on the Middle East, including the latest on the fight against ISIS in the Iraqi city of Mosul.

Swaths of cannabis in northern Morocco. The U.N. estimates 80,000 families in the rugged northern Rif mountains make their living from growing marijuana. Their efforst have made Morocco the main hashish supplier for Europe and the world.
Abdeljalil Bounhar / AP

Since 2013, European Union officials have seized hundreds of tons of hashish, worth more than $3 billion, from 20 ships traversing a lucrative drug trafficking route across the Mediterranean.

The drugs flow through multiple countries – Morocco, Libya, Egypt, and some Balkan states – and even areas controlled by self-proclaimed Islamic State militants, who are taxing the shipments as it goes through their territory.

U.S. Rep. Tom Cole introduced legislation this week authorizing the use of military force against Islamic State militants.

Under the bill to fight the group known as ISIS, there wouldn't be any geographic restrictions on the U.S. military, or a prohibition on sending U.S. ground troops into the region.

During his video response to President Obama's State of the Union address this week, Cole said the president didn't lay out a strategy to defeat ISIS.

Two riverine command boats like this one were taken into custody by Iran, along with 10 U.S. sailors.
MC2 Ecklund / U.S. Navy

Earlier this week Turkey attacked Islamic State forces in Iraq and Syria after a suicide bombing in Istanbul that killed 10 tourists. Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan says the tank and artillery attack killed nearly 200 militants.

World Views: December 4, 2015

Dec 4, 2015

Rebecca Cruise provides an update on this week's climate talks in Paris, and Joshua Landis discusses the British Parliament's vote to increase the country's involvement in Syria.

Then, retired diplomat Joe Cassidy talks about his 25-year career in the Foreign Service. In July, he wrote an editorial in Foreign Policy magazine with his prescription to fix the ailing U.S. State Department.

British protesters gather for a sit-in in London's Parliament Square Dec. 1, 2015 ahead of a vote to authorize increased military intervention in Syria.
Allsdare Hickson / FLickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

On Wednesday, bombs began falling in Syria hours after Britain’s Parliament voted overwhelmingly to approve airstrikes against ISIS militants in the country.

The 320-211 vote followed hours of debate, and could be a sign Europeans are starting to coalesce around a common goal of defeating radical Islamic militants in the wake of last month’s terrorist attacks in Paris, and security concerns in Brussels.

World Views: November 20, 2015

Nov 20, 2015

Joshua Landis and Rebecca Cruise talk about what's changed (or hasn't) since the Paris and Beiruit terrorist attacks a week ago, and whether or not the world will ever come to an agreement about how to deal with ISIS.

Then, Suzette Grillot talks with Vanessa Tucker from the international watchdog organization Freedom House. Every year the group issues rankings that compare the global political rights and civil liberties across the globe.

World leaders pause to honor the memory of the victims of the terrorist attacks in Paris at the G20 summit in Antalya, Turkey.
Kremlin.ru / Wikimedia Commons

It’s been a week since the world watched in horror as terrorists killed 130 people in a series of coordinated attacks across Paris, which came just a day after dozens were killed in an ISIS-claimed bombing in Beiruit.

U.S. Army Master Sgt. Joshua Wheeler
U.S. Department of Defense

The U.S. Department of Defense says an Army soldier from Oklahoma is the first military casualty while fighting militants with the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

The DoD said in a news release Friday Master Sgt. Joshua Wheeler was killed Thursday in Iraq. The 39-year-old native of Roland died from wounds sustained by enemy small-arms fire during a hostage rescue.

Gov. Mary Fallin called Wheeler a hero who stood up to evil in a social media post Friday afternoon.

Protesters on the streets of Izmir, Turkey Ocotber 10, 2015 after the bombing in Ankara earlier in the day.
Suzette Grillot / KGOU

Saturday’s bombing at a peace rally in Ankara – and related protests across the country – have united citizens in their frustration with Turkey’s leadership even as government officials say the attacks were intended to widen fissures and stir discontent in the country that straddles Europe and Asia.

ISIS propaganda shows explosives damaging the historic ancient Temple of Baalshamin in the ancient site of Palmyra.
Wnt / Wikimedia Commons

The Syrian government announced this week Islamic State militants destroyed 2,000-year-old tower tombs in the central city of Palmyra, claiming the Roman-era sites promote idolatry.

World Views: June 19, 2015

Jun 19, 2015

Guest host Brian Hardzinski talks with Joshua Landis about an important victory for Kurds in the Syrian town of Tel Abyad, and why Kurds have done so well when Arabs have not against Islamic State militants.

Then Suzette Grillot talks with David Deisley and Rob Perreault about resource extraction in Latin American countries.

MND-N (Multi National Division North) / U.S. Army

Kurdish fighters gained control of the Syrian town of Tal Abyad on the Turkish border on Tuesday, cutting off a key route between ISIS territory and the Turkish border

“This shuts the door on a big crossing. So it was an  important victory,” said Joshua Landis, the director of the University of Oklahoma’s Center for the Middle East Studies.

World Views: March 13, 2015

Mar 13, 2015

Rebecca Cruise and Suzette Grillot talk about racism and bigotry in a global context in light of this week’s events involving the University of Oklahoma's chapter of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. 

Then journalist and activist Hannah Storm from the International News Safety Institute explains about how much protection correspondents can reasonably expect as modern warfare evolves.

World Views: March 6, 2015

Mar 6, 2015

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss what Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s speech in Washington this week says about a possible shift in U.S./Middle East alliances. Many traditional U.S. allies are worried Washington might shift toward Iran and away from Israel and Saudi Arabia.

Later, Landis and Rebecca Cruise talk with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Gordon Wood. He compares this decade’s uprisings in the Arab World to what he calls an “Atlantic Spring” that started in 1776.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry shakes hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv, Israel, on July 23, 2014, before the two sat down to discuss a possible cease-fire to stop Israel's fight with Hamas in the Gaza Strip.
U.S. Department of State

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivered an address before Congress on Tuesday, urging President Obama not to craft a nuclear deal with Iran.

The domestic politics of the speech have been widely discussed, but the speech has raised issues of shifting U.S. alliances with Middle East countries.

World Views: February 6, 2015

Feb 6, 2015

Rebecca Cruise explains this week’s court ruling that no genocide was proven in the 1990s Serbia-Croatia conflict, and Joshua Landis describes the complex relationship between Jordan and the self-proclaimed Islamic State in light of the brutal murder of a Jordanian fighter pilot.

Then I’m joined by journalist Franz Bumeder. As a German radio correspondent in the 1990s, he reported on those wars in Kosovo, Bosnia, Croatia, and Macedonia.

Jordanian fighter pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh, who was burned alive by militants from the self-proclaimed Islamic State.
Petra / Jordan News Agency

This week Jordan vowed revenge for the death of a Jordanian pilot held by the Islamic State extremist group. A video online purportedly showed the pilot being burned to death in a cage by his captors. 

World Views: December 6, 2014

Dec 5, 2014

Joshua Landis and Suzette Grillot discuss riots in Egypt after a court in Cairo dropped its case against deposed dictator Hosni Mubarak, and about how a focus on counterterrorism has overtaken all hopes for democracy in the Middle East.

Then a conversation with literary critic Warren Motte about his work collecting tens of thousands of moments where characters gaze into mirrors.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry presides over a meeting of more than 60 anti-ISIL coalition parties held on December 3, 2014, at NATO Headquarters in Brussels, Belgium.
U.S. Department of State

Thousands of protesters took to the streets in Cairo throughout the week after a court ruled Saturday evening to dismiss charges against ousted dictator Hosni Mubarak over the killing of protesters during the 2011 uprising in Egypt.

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