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Keith Gaddie

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor speaks with political scientist Dr. Keith Gaddie of the University of Oklahoma. The two dissect campaign activity leading up to the general election on Nov 6, including negative ads, push polls and the influx of dark money.

Erik Hersman/Flickr

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley are joined once again by political scientist Keith Gaddie.

The three discuss the surge in voter registration ahead of the June 26 primary election, how State Question 788 could affect turnout and the three-way tie in the race for Oklahoma’s governorship.

Oklahoma state Rep. Kevin Calvey, R-Oklahoma City, speaks during a news conference in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. Calvey is term-limited out of the House, and 12 Republicans are vying to replace him.
Sue Ogrocki / AP Photo

Ahead of the June 26 primary election, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley are joined by University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie to discuss the nearly 600 candidates running for office ahead this year in Oklahoma.

President Lyndon Johnson, left, shakes civil rights leader the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s hand immediately after signing the Voting Rights Act, August 6, 1965.
Yoichi Okamoto / LBJ Library Photo (Public Domain)

Next week marks the third anniversary of an incredibly consequential U.S. Supreme Court decision that struck down key provisions of landmark civil rights legislation. The high court’s 5-4 ruling in Shelby County vs. Holder meant that Alabama and many other southern states no longer had to seek federal approval to change their election laws under the Voting Rights Act.

But what happened, and how we got there, is so much more complicated. To really understand the narrative arc of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, you have to go back 100 years to the end of the Civil War and the three so-called “Reconstruction Amendments” to the U.S. Constitution. The 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments outlawed slavery, established citizenship for blacks, and gave them the right to vote.

Bethany Hardzinski / KGOU

On Tuesday, the first organized resistance to Oklahoma’s “right-to-farm” movement gathered at the state Capitol to voice their opposition to State Question 777, which will put the issue before a vote of the people in November 2016.

Some background: right-to-farm is the idea there’s a guaranteed, unalienable right for farmers and ranchers to earn a living free from government intervention.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump at a campaign stop, Sept. 3, 2015.
Michael Vadon / Flickr

 

The air conditioner hums in Fredy Valencia’s office in south Oklahoma City - a tiny covey in an church with a desk, a computer and a few worn chairs. Sitting at his computer, Valencia works on plans for a protest he is helping lead during Donald Trump’s campaign stop this Friday at the Oklahoma state fair.

“If people want to attack our community, people attack us, we’ll speak up and we’ll have something to say about it,” Valencia said.

Oklahoma Democrats picked up a historically Republican seat in the state House after Cyndi Munson defeated GOP nominee Chip Carter in Tuesday’s special election.

The seat opened after the April death of state Rep. David Dank. Munson earned nearly 54 percent of the vote Tuesday. She lost to Dank by a similar 56-44 margin in 2014.

StickWare / Flickr

Two combat veterans, a contentious state schools superintendent race, and Oklahoma's first African-American female Senate candidate face Oklahoma voters this week.

Early voting began Thursday and continued into the weekend, and the winners in Tuesday's runoff advance to November's election to square off against nominees who found out their fate just over two months ago after the June 24 primary.

KGOU News Director Ben Fenwick gathered University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie, Oklahoma Watch political reporter M. Scott Carter, and eCapitol News Director Shawn Ashley to discuss some of the implications of what's left on the ballot.

Here are three contests they're keeping an eye on:

StickWare / Flickr

Early voting begins Thursday in runoffs that feature two statewide races for Democratic voters and runoffs for both parties in the 5th District U.S. House contest. 

Democrats will choose nominees in a U.S. Senate race and for Superintendent of Public Instruction. Several state House and Senate contests are also on the ballot.

eCapitol's Shawn Ashley told KGOU's Ben Fenwick it's the first time Oklahoma has had statewide races in a runoff in August, and that could affect voter turnout. 

World Views: August 8, 2014

Aug 8, 2014

Suzette Grillot talks with University of Oklahoma political scientist Keith Gaddie about West Africa's worst Ebola outbreak in history, and Monday's anniversary of Britain's entry into World War I.

Later, a conversation about education and development in Africa with OU economist and international and area studies professor Moussa Blimpo.

350.org / Flickr Creative Commons

A Sept. 21 protest against the Keystone XL Pipeline attracted 74 people who walked a portion of the pipeline’s proposed route, The Journal Record reports.