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MAPS

Mayor David Holt makes his first State of the City address Thursday at the Cox Convention Center in downtown Oklahoma City.
Mark Hancock / Journal Record

In this week's episode of the Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses Oklahoma City Major David Holt's idea for future MAPS sales taxes, and some of the citizen-submitted suggestions for MAPS 4, including a tourism-level aquarium.

The Santa Fe Station was built in 1934. It served passenger trains until 1979, and then again from 1999 to the present.
Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

Kaye Burlison remembers what the Santa Fe train station looked like in her youth: rusted metal canopies that stained the building’s limestone exterior, and windows fogged up from the uneven temperature control inside.  

“It was rust-colored instead of cream, so it was definitely in disrepair, ” Burlison said.

Workers install a stone façade outside one of four Senior Wellness Centers being built as part of Oklahoma City’s MAPS 3 program.
Samuel Perry / The Journal Record

Several Oklahoma City civic leaders gathered Tuesday evening for a town hall meeting to discuss the city’s 10-year general obligation bond issue, which voters won’t decide until next year.

SW 25th Street in Oklahoma City's Capitol Hill neighborhood.
Jason B. / Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Community groups are starting to gather ideas that could be included in a potential fourth Metropolitan Area Projects, or MAPS, plan.

A group called MAPS 4 Neighborhoods is holding meetings to gather ideas for the next phase of a sales tax that funds community improvements.

Workers uncap a well in the western Oklahoma oil field in 2014.
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

Slumping oil prices have fueled thousands of job losses in big energy states like Oklahoma, which is “gripped by a mini-recession,” economist Mark Snead tells the Journal Record‘s Kirby Lee Davis:

“The notion that Oklahoma has diversified away from oil and gas is, at this point, many, many years away,” he said.

Bill Mihas, the owner of Coney Island in downtown Oklahoma City
Joe Wertz / StateImpact Oklahoma

It’s been nearly 20 years since a bomb destroyed the Murrah building in Oklahoma City, killing 168 people and injuring hundreds more. As Oklahoma City prepares to look back on the bombing, one thing is clear — downtown OKC is a far different, and much better place than it was in April 1995. And it’s hard to deny the role the bombing played in the area’s resurgence.