KGOU

National Severe Storms Laboratory

National Severe Storms Laboratory

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Spring means severe weather is likely in Oklahoma, and when weather turns violent KGOU will break into regular programming to let you, our listeners, know what to expect.

Through our partnership with KOCO-5, we’ll provide continuous coverage from the KOCO weather team and Chief Meteorologist Damon Lane when conditions warrant.

In addition to regular weather segments throughout the day, we’ll also deliver weather updates and alerts on social media – Facebook and Twitter – and through text messages.

Researchers fly a copter drone near Enid, Oklahoma on May 16, 2017
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, could help scientists forecast where and when thunderstorms develop, before storm even occur. Experiments are ongoing, and optimism is high.

A tornado touches down near Wynnewood, Oklahoma on May 9, 2016.
Hayden Mahan

The Myriad Botanical Gardens in downtown Oklahoma City is bustling with activity on a sunny day as people push strollers, walk dogs and feed the ducks. It’s a gorgeous Wednesday afternoon right now, but it’s springtime in Oklahoma, so the weather can change at any time.

“When it starts raining, is when I start looking at the messages,” Devonte Thibodeax said as walked along the garden’s waterway with Michaela Schweiger.

“If my iPhone does those alerts, where it goes off, that’s when we know something is actually happening,” Schweiger said.