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oklahoma

Woman on her claim in 1889.
Oklahoma Historical Society

A Kansas reporter wrote in 1893 he had discovered an all-female town in Oklahoma. But when he tried to go back to the village one week later, it was gone. 

 

KGOU listener Bart Varner asked How Curious: What happened? 

High school students pack into front row seats at the University of Oklahoma stadium in Norman on a muggy Thursday evening, set to watch the city’s biggest rivalry: the Norman High School Tigers versus the Norman North Timberwolves.

Students enter Lexington Elementary School on April 13 after the school was closed for nine school days during the teacher walkout.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

The latest counts of emergency certified teachers in Oklahoma capture a stubborn reality: Classrooms across the state are being staffed by a teacher who isn’t fully trained or prepared.

Sam Anderson, a staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, describes his debut book as "a love letter to Oklahoma City, which is the most secretly interesting place in America."

 

Kevin Stitt is shown speaking at a forum hosted by Edmond Republican Women on May 21.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Republican gubernatorial candidate Kevin Stitt’s mortgage company did not tell Wisconsin officials about its run-ins with other states’ regulators when it applied for a mortgage banking license a decade ago, according to documents obtained by Oklahoma Watch.

Oklahoma’s adoption of medical marijuana will be green in more ways than one: Retail dispensaries, processors, growing operations and tax agencies will have to work within a cash-only industry.

Marijuana leaf
Wikimedia Commons

For Oklahoma inmates, the state’s legalization of medical marijuana will not translate into access in the state prison system.

A tank filled with liquid nitrogen is seen outside of an Oklahoma City business that sells nitrogen for various commercial uses.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

The condemned man enters the room where he will draw his last breath.

He will be restrained in some way, perhaps strapped to the T-shaped platform where other offenders have been executed by injection.

Oklahoma Department of Transportation

“Don’t be a stinker, use your blinker.”

 

Voters approved the sale, cultivation and transportation of medical marijuana by passing State Question 788 in June 2018.
Mia Mamone / KGOU

On Wednesday, Gov. Mary Fallin signed into law emergency medical marijuana rules, including two controversial amendments approved by the state board of health earlier this week.

Crescent Public Schools Superintendent Bart Watkins said while his district spend a relatively high percentage of its funding on instruction, it has been forced to make cuts, including in number of positions.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Amid an intensifying drumbeat of political promises to propel schools to spend more of their dollars in the classroom, Crescent Public Schools stands out.

An albino western diamondback rattlesnake is one of about 35 reptiles on exhibit at the OKC Rattlesnake Museum.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

A museum showcasing some of the nation’s deadliest snakes opened Wednesday in Oklahoma City.

The Wewoka train depot in Wewoka, Oklahoma.
Seminole Nation Museum, Wewoka, OK

Frank Baker grew up hearing his family members use a specific expression. If something was messed up or shady, they would say it was "worse than a Wewoka switch."

He asked "How Curious:" Where did this slang come from? And what is a "Wewoka switch?" 

A sign advertises recreational and medical marijuana outside a dispensary in Colorado.
David Anderson / David Anderson

Pregnant women would be barred from obtaining a medical marijuana license if voters on Tuesday approve State Question 788, under proposed rules under consideration at the Oklahoma State Department of Health. The draft rules would also restrict people on probation and those recently convicted of a felony from obtaining a commercial license.

How Curious question-asker Greg Elwell stands outside Robert's Grill in El Reno. Elwell asked How Curious if it's illegal in Oklahoma to take a bite of someone else's hamburger.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

In our last episode, listener Greg Elwell asked How Curious if it was really illegal in Oklahoma to take a bite of someone else’s hamburger. This week, we have an update.

Robert's Grill in El Reno, Oklahoma has been serving up onion burgers like this one since 1926.
Claire Donnelly / KGOU

Many lists of unusual state statutes say it's against the law in Oklahoma to take a bite of someone else's hamburger. 

KGOU listener Greg Elwell asked "How Curious:" Is this a real law?

A newspaper advertisement for the Russian Dream House printed in The Oklahoman, September 1963.
The Oklahoman Digital Archives / The Oklahoman

A tiny "Russian Dream House" appears in an Oklahoma City neighborhood in 1963. And then it disappears. 

Dana Billingsley asked "How Curious:" What was this house? And where did it come from?

Nomin Ujiyediin / KGOU

A crowd of thousands filled the Jim Norick Arena at the Oklahoma State Fair Park on Saturday for the Cowboys of Color Rodeo.

Founded by Cleo Hearns, the rodeo has also been held in Tulsa, Okla.; Fort Worth, Texas; Dallas, Texas; and other cities.  It comes to Oklahoma City once a year.  Competitive events include calf roping, bull riding and relay races.

Former Oklahoma City mayor George Shirk examines an old stove in the Chinese “city” under Oklahoma City, 1969.
Jim Argo / The Oklahoman

For decades, Oklahoma residents have circulated rumors about a vast network of tunnels under downtown Oklahoma city where hundreds of Chinese immigrants lived at the turn of the century.

 

KGOU listener Gypsy Hogan asked “How Curious:” did those tunnels really exist?

Coming Soon: How Curious

Mar 16, 2018

KGOU’s new podcast is called “How Curious.” Hosted by Claire Donnelly, it explores your questions about Oklahoma. If you have a question for “How Curious," email curious@kgou.org.

 

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