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Oklahoma City Council

OKC Parking Challenges Could Lead To Meter Price Hike

Feb 19, 2020
A recent study of parking in downtown Oklahoma City recommended raising the price of on-street parking in the city center by 50 cents an hour and setting prices for other meters based on demand.
(Photo by Russell Ray)

One-fourth of downtown Oklahoma City is composed of parking garages. But these private lots often sit empty, with residents more likely to pay for on-street parking. To incentivize the public to use the vacant lots, the City Council is considering raising on-street parking meter prices by 50 cents. Journal Record editor Russell Ray discusses the city's parking challenges and how stakeholders are reacting to the possible price hike. 

medical marijuana
David Trawin / Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Oklahomans will have many legal questions about medical marijuana, but attorneys say existing rules might make it difficult to answer them. Marijuana is illegal at the federal, and rules of professional conduct in Oklahoma prohibit attorneys from counseling or assisting clients in criminal or fraudulent conduct.

The Oklahoma County Jail.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Local government has taken another step to improve cooperation between law enforcement and conditions in the Oklahoma County Jail.

First National Center in Oklahoma City
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City’s City Council agreed to invest $45 million in the vacant First National Center at Tuesday’s meeting.

Developers Gary Brooks and Charlie Nicholas purchased the building in January for $23 million. They plan to redevelop it as a mixed-use residential and commercial property, according to the Journal Record’s Brian Brus.

A man walks past the old city jail property in downtown Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

The old Oklahoma City jail could be put to a new use.

Photograph used for a newspaper owned by the Oklahoma Publishing Company. Caption: "First Parking Meter"
Oklahoma Historical Society

The Oklahoma City City Council is considering replacing most of the city’s coin-operated parking meters, but losing them means losing part of the city’s history.

Oklahoma City Fire Chief Keith Bryant speaks on the phone in his office Tuesday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Oklahoma City and the union representing the city’s firefighters have come to a last-minute agreement on the department’s contract. The International Association of Firefighters Local 157 says accepting the decision saves taxpayers an unnecessary expense.

Several months have passed since an independent arbitration sided with the fire department, but City Hall thought about fighting back, and considered calling a public vote on the union’s contract.

Oklahoma City skyline
Greater Oklahoma City Chamber and Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

The Oklahoma City Council approved mid-year budget cuts of more than $9 million dollars at its regular meeting Tuesday. The amendment is the city’s second cut this year.

Updated December 6, 1:50 p.m.

Sales tax revenue is projected to fall 2.6 percent this year, and City Manager Jim Couch says it's declined every month this year compared to the same month in 2015.

An artist’s conception of a proposed hotel that would be attached to downtown Oklahoma City’s new convention center.
Provided / Omni Hotel and Resorts

Earlier this week, the Oklahoma City Council voted 7-2 to pursue negotiations with the developer Omni for a proposed hotel attached to downtown Oklahoma City’s new convention center that’s part of the MAPS 3 series of projects.

The abandoned Lantana Apartments complex at 7408 NW 10th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The big news that came out of this week’s Oklahoma City Council meeting involved the body formally voicing its opposition to State Question 777 – the so-called “right-to-farm” proposal.

Oklahoma City Council member Pete White, left, and council attorney Kenneth Jordan in a council meeting at City Hall.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

The Oklahoma City Council passed a resolution Tuesday formally opposing State Question 777, which is commonly known as the “right-to-farm” amendment. The proposal would add a new section to state law guaranteeing farmers and ranchers can operate without interference unless the state has a compelling reason to get involved.

Damage from a May 6, 2015 tornado in south Oklahoma City.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

The Oklahoma City council approved an update to the city’s outdoor warning siren system on Tuesday that should reduce over-warnings by up to 68 percent and eliminate false warnings.

Oklahoma City has 182 warning sirens that span three counties. Currently, any National Weather Service tornado warning in Oklahoma, Cleveland or Canadian County would activate all the sirens in that county.

Under the new plan, the city is divided into nine sectors. Sirens will only be activated in the sectors that are under threat of a tornado.

homeless person holding a sign
AR McLin / Flickr

The Oklahoma City Council voted unanimously Tuesday morning to introduce an ordinance that prohibits panhandlers on medians.

Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Oklahoma City covers more than 600 square miles, and completely surrounds several communities. That can lead to lost or delayed revenue, which is becoming even more problematic with the rise of so-called “gig economy” businesses like Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb.

During Tuesday’s city council meeting, Oklahoma City’s assistant treasurer Matt Boggs said Oklahoma City recapture $1.1 million in lost revenue during the fiscal year that ended June 30.

Oklahoma City Public Schools

Oklahoma City Public Schools board members say they learned about a city plan to extend the period for redirecting downtown tax revenue away from schools and other purposes only after the City Council voted to go ahead with evaluating the plan.