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Oklahoma City University

Oklahoma Colleges Bet On Esports

Apr 24, 2019
Connor Nguyen, at right, and Griffin Williams, second from right, representing an esports team at the University of California, Irvine, compete at the Shine eSports festival in Boston in 2017. A growing number of U.S. schools offer at least partial schola
AP photo/Collin Binkley

Universities across Oklahoma are developing esports programs to attract new students. Journal Record reporter Brian Brus discusses how the market share for esports has grown and how students at some colleges are receiving esports scholarships. 

Tudor Crossing Apartments at 1346 SW 74th St. in Oklahoma City.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Investors were putting money into multifamily housing complexes during the first quarter of 2018, but higher interest rates could slow future investment according to a report by the Journal Record’s Molly Fleming.

This week on the Business Intelligence Report, Fleming talks with KGOU about apartment investments, and a program at the University of Oklahoma School of Law that provides pro bono legal services to tenants who are facing eviction.

Amos Kofa studies in the library at the University of Oklahoma School of Law in Norman.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

As the number of applications for law schools decline nationwide, some universities are considering a shakeup to their admittance process.

Fourteen universities now allow students to submit GRE scores, instead of the  LSAT. Among the schools that have made the switch are Harvard, Columbia, Northwestern and Texas A&M.

Nancy Parsons, CEO and president of CDR Assessment Group Inc., speaks at the 2020 Woman on Boards conference at Oklahoma City University’s Meinders School of Business.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Women comprise at least 20 percent of board members at only four publicly-traded corporations in Oklahoma. Those companies are Devon Energy Corp., OGE Energy Corp., Magellan Midstream Partners and Sonic Corp.

Michelle Roselle (right) is a senior at Oklahoma City University and portrays Oklahoma City bombing survivor Florence Rogers (left) in "The 20th Anniversary Oklahoma City Bombing Project," a play from Oklahoma City University’s School of Theatre.
Rachel Hubbard / Oklahoma Public Media Exchange

Editor's Note: In a previous version of this story, Michelle Roselle's opening monologue was misidentified as portraying Florence Rogers instead of Jenifer Reynolds. 

Everyone remembers exactly where they were when they found out about the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building on April 19, 1995. It’s a moment frozen in time.

OCU School of Law

Officials have announced plans to launch a national center for homeland security law and policy at an Oklahoma law school.

The Oklahoma City University's School of Law will be home to the new Judge Alfred P. Murrah Center for Homeland Security Law and Policy. Lt. Gov. Todd Lamb called the center a noble effort that will be historic and impactful.

Former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating and a former general counsel of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will chair the center's advisory board.

Paige / Flickr.com

Oklahoma City University's School of Law is moving its library into a historic building in downtown Oklahoma City.

More than 90,000 books and 22 cabinets of microfiche will begin making the move Thursday into the old Central High School building at 800 North Harvey. The move is part of the law school's transition into the historic building that has been completely renovated.

The presidents of 13 Oklahoma colleges and universities are calling on Oklahoma's five U.S. Representatives to work for passage of immigration reform this year.

A letter from the 13 to Republican Reps. Tom Cole, Frank Lucas, Markwayne Mullin, Jim Bridenstine and James Lankford calls for "a comprehensive, bipartisan solution."