KGOU

protests

A field medic raises her fist as protestors stand near a fire blocking a road along the Dakota Access Pipeline Route near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota.
Oceti Sakowin Camp / CC BY-NC 2.0

Oklahoma legislators are advancing a bill that outlaws trespassing on sites containing “critical infrastructure.” Supporters say the measure will help prevent damage and disruption of energy markets, electric grids and water services, but environmental activists and civil rights groups say the bill’s real purpose is to block political protests of pipelines and similar projects.

‘A NUMBER ON MY ARM’

World Views: April 25, 2014

Apr 25, 2014

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss President Obama's trip to Asia this week, and whether or not we'll finally see the long-anticipated foreign policy "pivot" to the region. They also talk about the kidnapping of hundreds of young girls in Nigeria.

Later, a conversation with activist, author and filmmaker Clifton Ross. He says solidarity among Latin American protesters and dedication to their cause can actually work against them.

andresAzp / Flickr Creative Commons

Translator, filmmaker, and author Clifton Ross says most Latin American social movements began among the indigenous people and urban poor during the 1970s and 80s as a response to neoliberal economic policies and limited citizen access to the political process.

World Views: July 5, 2013

Jul 5, 2013

Two days after Egypt's military removed President Mohammed Morsi and replaced him with the country's Supreme Constitutional Court Chief Justice, Suzette Grillot and Joshua Landis talk with incoming University of Oklahoma Middle East scholar and Muslim Brotherhood expert Samer Shehata about what's next for the country.

On Tuesday, militants detonated a suicide car bomb at the gate of a NATO compound in Kabul killing five guards and two civilians. Dana Mohammad-Zadeh says knowing attacks like these will happen is part of life in Afghanistan’s capital city. She earned a degree in Economics and International Studies from the University of Oklahoma in 2012, and now works in the development sector in Kabul.

Gigi Ibrahim / Flickr Creative Commons

Earlier this week a top judge replaced Islamist leader Mohammed Morsi as Egypt’s president as the army cracks down on the Muslim Brotherhood.

In his final days in power, Egypt's embattled president was defiant even though his allies abandoned him.

Record numbers of protesters gathered in Alexandria and Cairo on June 30 calling for Morsi’s removal, resignation, or early presidential elections. Incoming University of Oklahoma Middle East scholar and Muslim Brotherhood expert Samer Shehata says the millions of protesters exceeded his expectations of the June 30 movement.

World Views: June 21, 2013

Jun 21, 2013

Rebecca Cruise returns and guest-hosts while Suzette Grillot joins the program from Italy to talk about protests sweeping Brazil's largest cities, and the implications of the newly-elected moderate president for the future of a nuclear Iran.

University of California, Berkeley historian Daniel Sargent argues the 1970s were a pivotal decade on the global stage. He calls U.S. foreign policy immediately after the Cold War “uninspiring.”

Tanya Rego / Agência Brasil/Wikimedia Commons

Residents of Brazil's largest cities have awakened to streets that are still smoldering after a million protesters turned out overnight -- sometimes clashing violently with police during anti-government demonstrations.

"This seems to be seems to be somewhat of a surprise given that Brazil was an economic success story for the last decade or so," says Rebecca Cruise, the Assistant Dean of the University of Oklahoma's College of International Studies. "[It was] leading the BRIC (Brazil, Russia, India, China) countries in GDP and really doing quite well."