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tribal gaming

KGOU - Dick Pryor

Money is coming into the state of Oklahoma from tribal gaming in December, but what to do with exclusivity fee payments from January is up in the air. eCapitol news director Shawn Ashley tells Dick Pryor the governor's office is researching the issue.

KGOU

As he continues to push for renegotiation of the state of Oklahoma's gaming compacts with tribal nations, Governor Kevin Stitt is asking for public support. At a press conference on Thursday, Stitt asked Oklahomans to stand with him on the issue to get a "good deal" done for Oklahoma. No negotiations have occurred and the governor's office and tribal leaders have not agreed on whether the compacts expire on January 1, 2020, as the governor contends. KGOU's Dick Pryor and eCapitol's Shawn Ashley discuss the latest developments and more.

Gov. Kevin Stitt describes how he plans to implement campgin promises.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Tribal gaming negotiations got off to a rough start last month. Now, Gov. Stitt is responding to pushback and explains why he thinks tribes should pay more for the exclusive rights to operate casino games in Oklahoma.

peggydavis66 / Flickr.com

Twenty-nine tribal leaders sent a letter to Gov. Stitt saying they “stand united” when it comes to Oklahoma’s Gaming Compact. The letter followed the governor’s announcement in early July that he wants to renegotiate the agreement, which allows tribes to operate casino games in exchange for giving the state a percentage of their revenue through “exclusivity fees.”

Cherokee Nation

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU’s Dick Pryor and eCapitol’s Shawn Ashley speak with Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. of the Cherokee Nation. Hoskin discusses Cherokee Nation’s investments in health and education, the tribe’s perspective on renegotiating gaming compacts, and more.

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Katelyn Holbrook, with Integrity Gaming, practices dealing cards to Rustin Martin, also with Integrity, at the Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association’s annual conference in Oklahoma City.
Mark Hancock / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s tribes will be in unfamiliar territory in January 2020: Gaming compacts between the tribes and the state could end at that time.

Unless, of course, they don’t.

Moyen Brenn / Flickr.com

A new report shows the state of Oklahoma collected $122 million in gaming fees from Native American tribes during the last fiscal year.

The report issued Wednesday by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services shows that for the first time ever, the fees paid to the state declined from the previous year.

The report noted a drop of nearly $5.5 million — or about 4 percent — from previous year's collections. The funds are used primarily for public education.

gambling man
Adrian Simpson / Flickr Creative Commons

The Cherokee Nation is marking 10 years since Oklahoma voters approved a constitutional amendment that allowed the state to negiated with Oklahoma tribes to operate Las Vegas-style gaming.

The Tahlequah-based tribe is preparing to mark the passage of State Question 712 at a ceremony Monday at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.