KGOU

The University of Oklahoma

This is the Manager’s Minute.

KGOU broadcasts from five full power transmitters and four translators, but we also serve listeners through our “worldwide transmitter”: www.kgou.org.

On our website, you can find news stories and resources, community events, streaming audio, weather, the program schedule and information about our programs.

You can donate online, and also find staff bios, station history, awards, and job opportunities.

Caroline Halter/KGOU

DJ and producer Stevie Johnson recently completed his PhD at the University of Oklahoma in higher education administration focusing on the experiences of black men at historically white colleges. In addition to a traditional written dissertation, he created a Hip-Hop album called “Curriculum of the Mind.”

KGOU Salutes Students

May 12, 2019
KGOU Radio

This is the Manager’s Minute.

With the Spring semester over at the University of Oklahoma it’s time for us to say “so long” to students who’ve been part of our team the last few months.

Practicum students Gabriel Castillo and Lauren Owen did community calendars and audio production, and Independent Study student Ricky Tippett produced KGOU promotional spots.

We're glad to say two other Gaylord College students, Katelyn Howard and Taitum Wilson, will be back with us this summer.

And, we have a special shout-out for former host and reporter Storme Jones.

Caroline Halter / KGOU

Levi Hilliard and Jess Eddy waited patiently outside a closed-door meeting of the University of Oklahoma Board of Regents for nearly seven hours Thursday. The men have accused former OU president David Boren and former Vice President Trip Hall of sexual misconduct, which Boren and Hall deny.

Caroline Halter/KGOU

James Gallogly has focused on cost-cutting since becoming the University of Oklahoma’s 14th president on July 2. But at a press conference Thursday Gallogly announced how he plans to grow the university by investing in “human capital.”

The Boren Legacy

Apr 22, 2018
University of Oklahoma Video and Media Services

Join KGOU Sunday, April 22nd at noon for "The Boren Legacy", an intimate conversation with outgoing University of Oklahoma President David L. Boren and First Lady Molly Shi Boren on the influence and impact of their leadership during their tenure at OU.  "The Boren Legacy" is a production of OU's Video & Media Services

Funding Update

Mar 7, 2018

This is the Manager’s Minute.

KGOU is licensed to the University of Oklahoma (we are a department of OU Outreach), so when the state of Oklahoma cuts funding to higher education we get less money, too.

KGOU has seen a drop in state funding of more than 22 percent over the last ten years, so your donations are vital to our operations.

Forty percent of our annual revenue – more than $560,000 - comes from membership.

About a third of our funding comes from business support for program underwriting – that’s roughly $450,000 per year.

Welcome, Students

Sep 8, 2017
KGOU Radio

This is the Manager’s Minute.

A new semester has started at the University of Oklahoma, so it’s time to welcome students who will learn the craft, and art, of radio at KGOU.

We have several students from the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Three students - Jessica Aranda, Blake Bush and Adam Johnson – are in Radio News. They’ll be contributing to our newscasts and Assignment Radio webpage.

We have three Practicum students – Michelle Velasco Alba, Austin Robinson and Zack Kerbo.

Celebrating Radio

Aug 20, 2017

This is the Manager’s Minute.

August twentieth is National Radio Day, a time for celebrating radio and the public service local stations provide.

The University of Oklahoma was a radio pioneer.

An OU student started radio broadcasts in 1921; the station became WNAD in 1922, and was licensed to OU in 1923.

The University sold WNAD AM and FM in the early 70’s shortly after launching a new commercial station, KGOU, in late 1970.

Then, KGOU featured news, sports and music and was staffed by students, mostly volunteers.

Students End Semester

May 11, 2017

This is the Manager’s Minute.

The end of the Spring semester at the University of Oklahoma is a time of transition for students who have spent the past several months at KGOU.

Gaylord College students Amber Friend and Zachary Brown learned how to produce stories in the Radio News class.

In her Practicum class, Macee Beheler produced Capitol Insider segments and wrote stories about state government and politics for the Capitol Insider web page.

KGOU / OU Outreach

This is the Manager’s Minute.

Hard to believe, but KGOU has been in its “new” studios for ten years. We’re glad to be located on the University of Oklahoma’s Norman campus, but after ten years, the equipment we bought when we moved in, is showing its age.

Electronic equipment just wears out over time. The Oklahoma City transmitter needs a new tube, and the whole thing will need to be replaced before long. After ten years, our main audio console and on-air automation computers are becoming less reliable and need maintenance more often.

Storme Jones / KGOU

 

A five-star point guard from Norman North High School made his college decision on Thursday. Trae Young is staying close to home.

Young said his decision was difficult but he reached a place of peace.

“That place of peace for me, in the fall of 2017, will be at the University of Oklahoma,” Young said.

University of Oklahoma running back Joe Mixon speaks with reporters during the media day for the Orange Bowl at Sun Life Stadium Dec. 29, 2015, in Miami Gardens, Fla., two days before OU played Clemson University.
Joe Skipper / AP

University of Oklahoma head football coach Bob Stoops says running back Joe Mixon would be off the team if the 2014 altercation that ended with him punching a woman in the face happened now instead of two years ago.

The incident happened in July 2014. Mixon entered an Alford plea to misdemeanor assault charges, asserting his innocence while acknowledging there likely was enough evidence to convict him. Mixon was ordered to perform 100 hours of community service and attend behavioral counseling. He was suspended for the entire 2014 season.

Berrien Moore, vice president of the University of Oklahoma’s weather and climate programs, talks with Sean Crowell, senior research scientist, at the school’s campus in Norman Friday.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

NASA has awarded a five-year, $166 million grant to the University of Oklahoma to study how carbon interacts with the land, the atmosphere, and the ocean.

OU says the Geostationary Carbon Cycle Observatory (GeoCARB) will monitor plant health and vegetation stress across North and South America. The satellite 22,000 miles above the equator will also study the sources and processes controlling carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methane in Earth's atmosphere. 

University of Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield (6) celebrates a touchdown pass to wide receiver Dede Westbrook (11) during the second half of the Red River Rivalry game in Dallas Saturday, Oct. 8, 2016. Oklahoma won 45-40.
LM Otero / AP

Two University of Oklahoma football players will be in New York City this weekend as finalists for one of their sport's most prestigious awards.

The trust that oversees the Heisman Trophy announced Monday evening quarterback Baker Mayfield and wide receiver Dede Westbrook are both finalists for the award.

Westbrook set OU's single-season record for touchdown catches with 16 this year, and his nearly 1,500 receiving yards in 2016 are the second-most in school history in a single year.

Germany's Fabian Hambuechen, Britain's Nile Wilson, and United States' Danell Leyva celebrate during the medal ceremony for horizontal bar during 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Aug. 16, 2016.
Rebecca Blackwell / AP

An Olympic hallmark since the 1932 games, the Olympic Village in Rio de Janeiro hosted University of Oklahoma men’s gymnastics coach Mark Williams and his team this summer. Of all the spectacles he saw in Brazil, Williams found the facility one of the most striking.

“The Olympic village is just an amazing place. You can sit down and have lunch and have five different languages in your ear,” Williams said. “One day I just started to count, and I think I got up to 35 different countries represented within about 100 feet of me.”

University of Oklahoma Vice President of the University Community Jabar Shumate.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

 

 

The University of Oklahoma made national headlines in March 2015 when members of a the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity were recorded singing a racist chant on a bus while traveling to an event. Immediately following the spread of the video, the university expelled two students and shut down the SAE fraternity’s chapter on campus.

One Year Later: A Look Back At The University Of Oklahoma SAE Incident

Mar 7, 2016
Jesse Robbins speaks in front of students at a town hall forum on race and diversity at the University of Oklahoma.
Jacob McCleland / KGOU

It has been once year since the Sigma Alpha Epsilon incident on the University of Oklahoma campus. In March of 2015, members of OU’s Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity were captured in a cell phone video singing a racist chant while on a bus to a fraternity event.

That nine second video went viral on social media, and sparked a fire storm on campus. Students of color at OU had already expressed concerns about race relations on campus, and the video brought those issues into stark relief.

Last month students packed around long plastic tables, talking and sharing turkey, pumpkin pie and each others’ company. The event was called Queersgiving. In recent years the term “queer” has been adopted by the LGBTG movement. According to PLAG, the nation’s largest LGBTQ ally organization, the word is used to describe anyone who “feels somehow outside of the societal norms in regards to gender or sexuality.” The dinner gave University of Oklahoma students who identify as queer a chance to meet and bond with each other.

The statue of Bennie Owen stands in front of athletic dorms on the east side of Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, which Owen helped build in the early 1920s.
Brian Hardzinski / KGOU

Before Bud Wilkinson won 47 straight, before Barry Switzer “hung half-a-hundred” on his opponents, and before Bob Stoops restored the shine to the University of Oklahoma’s football program in the early 2000s, there was Bennie Owen.

The diminutive Arkansas City, Kansas native arrived at the University of Oklahoma in 1905 to coach a football team that had only briefly tasted success in its first decade of existence.

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