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Williams Companies

Laboratory manager Karim Saadeddine prepares a soil sample for testing at TerraCon Consultants, 4701 N. Stiles Ave. in Oklahoma City. TerraCon holds a summer jobs program for teachers.
Brent Fuchs / Journal Record

Oklahoma’s education department is looking for companies to host teachers this summer.

Last year, a pilot program placed teachers with companies that hire people in science, math, engineering and technology, or STEM, related fields. The state is trying to expand the program this year.

Businesses are surrounded by floodwaters from Harvey, in Humble, Texas.
David J. Phillip / AP

Oklahoma energy businesses who operate in Houston and the Texas and Louisiana coast have been affected by Hurricane Harvey’s massive flooding.

This week on The Business Intelligence Report, Journal Record senior reporter Sarah Terry-Cobo discusses the storm’s impact on Oklahoma's energy industry.

TRANSCRIPT

A Williams Cos. employee monitors the company’s compressor station in Sumas, Wash.
Courtesy photo

On Wednesday Dallas-based Energy Transfer Equity announced it’s going to stop pursuing its merger with Tulsa-based Williams Cos. 

Updated 8:25 a.m.

Nearly half of the board of directors of Tulsa-based Williams Companies resigned Thursday during an afternoon closed-door meeting where a coalition attempted to oust CEO Alan Armstrong.

Tulsa-based Williams Companies is housed in the BOK Tower in downtown.
Caleb Long / Wikimedia Commons

Gov. Mary Fallin, Mayor Dewey Barlett and Tulsa Chamber of Commerce officials are in New York Friday, trying to stop Tulsa-based Williams Companies from moving 1,000 jobs out of the state as part of its merger with Energy Transfer Equity.

The group is meeting with Williams board chair Mike Neal. Fallin said they’re trying to convince him they want those jobs in Oklahoma.

Water flows from a fountain inside the Williams Cos. headquarters in downtown Tulsa.
Rip Stell / The Journal Record

Williams Companies and Energy Transfer Equity are in the process of merging, but they're also in a legal battle.

Tulsa-based Williams has filed lawsuits against Energy Transfer Equity and its chairman, Kelcy Warren, The Journal Record’s Sarah Terry-Cobo reports:

oil pump jack
Paul Lowry / Flickr

It’s been another volatile week for Oklahoma’s energy industry, and many of the state’s oil and gas companies released earnings report for the final quarter of 2015 that continue to paint a grim portrait of the economic downturn.

 

Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

Two Oklahoma energy companies announced key business decisions this – one took on more debt, and the other cut spending by $1 billion.

It’s been a rocky few months for SandRidge Energy – the company’s stock has been delisted from the New York Stock Exchange, and has been in a dispute with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission over compliance with wastewater directives in earthquake-prone areas. On Monday, the Oklahoma City-based company announced it would borrow $488 million to pay for general corporate operations.

Former Chesapeake Energy employees leave the building with their belongings after the Sept. 29, 2015 buyouts.
Brent Fuchs / The Journal Record

It's been a rocky five days for Oklahoma's energy sector, with downsizing, buyouts, and even a possible de-listing from the New York Stock Exchange.

Tulsa-based Williams Companies is housed in the BOK Tower in downtown.
Caleb Long / Wikimedia Commons

A Dallas-based company is set to complete the acquisition of one of Oklahoma's largest pipeline operators by the first quarter of 2016.

Energy Transfer Equity announced Monday that it will buy Tulsa's Williams Companies in a $37.7 billion deal.

The move will create the fifth-largest energy company in the world Williams Companies' net income fell 24 percent in the first six months of this year.