KGOU

women candidates

Members of the state Senate are shown here in May 2018. Seven of the 48 senators are women.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Before the first vote was even cast in Oklahoma’s elections this year, women had already made history.

State Sen. A.J. Griffin, R-Guthrie (left), and Gov. Mary Fallin speak at a March 31, 2015 bill signing for a bill requiring doctors in Oklahoma to check a new prescription drug database before prescribing certain addictive drugs.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Women, already underrepresented in the state Legislature, will hold fewer seats in 2017 despite a surge in the number of female candidates.

Those results, coupled with Hillary Clinton’s failed bid for the White House, have disheartened many women in Oklahoma. Now, at least in the Legislature, women from both parties intend to form a women’s caucus.

Margo Wright / Wikimedia Commons

A group of women who have held public office in Oklahoma say it is important for more women to become involved in politics.

At a meeting of the Norman Chamber of Commerce on Friday, the women set aside politics to underscore the need to add women's opinions and viewpoints to the public debate.

Former Lt. Gov. Jari Askins says state decisions that impact families need to have a female perspective.

State Rep. Leslie Osborn says there is no glass ceiling at the Legislature, but that not enough women are running for office.