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world history

This week, NPR reported that the Department of Veterans Affairs failed to live up to a promise to contact 4,000 veterans who were exposed to mustard gas in secret military experiments. In 1993, the VA promised it would reach out to each of those veterans to let them know that they were eligible for disability benefits. Instead, over the past 20 years, the VA reached out to only 610.

Seventy years ago today, the concentration camp Auschwitz was liberated by Soviet Troops. We mark the occasion by revisiting Here & Now host Jeremy Hobson’s 2014 conversation with Leslie Schwartz.

Schwartz and his family were deported from their home in Hungary to Auschwitz in 1944. He was the only member of that family to survive.

World Views: October 3, 2014

Oct 3, 2014

Suzette Grillot and Rebecca Cruise discuss the so-called "Umbrella Revolution" protests in Hong Kong , and the closing arguments in the Bosnian war crimes trial of Radovan Karadžić in The Hague.

Later, a conversation with University of Waterloo political scientist Mariam Mufti. She studies electoral and party politics in South Asia, as well as democratization and regime change.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm. Mike Mullen reviews Pakistani troops during a ceremony honoring Mullen's arrival to Islamabad, Pakistan, Feb. 9, 2008.
Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Chad J. McNeeley, U.S. Navy / Wikimedia Commons

In 1947, the Indian subcontinent gained independence from the United Kingdom and split into three states: the Muslim majority countries of East and West Pakistan and the Hindu majority country of India.

“This is very important for us to understand,” says University of Waterloo professor Mariam Mufti. “Because subsequently all of Pakistan's actions on the international community have been driven by this foreign policy that was very India-centric.”

World Views: May 23, 2014

May 23, 2014

University of Oklahoma Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students Clarke Stroud joins Suzette Grillot again on their European tour to discuss the concept of “euroskepticism” and the European Union's parliamentary elections.

Later, a conversation with UCLA historian Nile Green about putting Islam into the context of global history. He says the same religious fragmentation that causes sectarian violence in the Middle East leads to religious misunderstanding in the West.

Marc Ryckaert/Naamsvermelding vereist / /Wikimedia Commons

UCLA historian Nile Green boarded a train for Istanbul at 17 to get as far away as he possibly could from his home in England. As he traveled through India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan, he gradually learned the world’s Muslim population extends far beyond its Middle Eastern core.