COVID-19: Resources | KGOU
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COVID-19: Resources

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Resources and links to information about the novel coronavirus COVID-19

Fact vs. Rumor: FEMA's Coronavirus Rumor Control

World Health Organization (WHO) - COVID-19 Outbreak

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Coronavirus

CDC Guidance for Businesses and Employers

National Institutes for Health (NIH) (NIAID) - Coronaviruses

Johns Hopkins University is tracking the pandemic with clinical and public health surveillance data from the CDC, WHO, and countries across the globe. The site includes the global case tracker, daily reports, FAQs with experts, and more: https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/ #covid_19 #johnshopkinsuniversity

Surgeon General of the United States - Dr. Jerome Adams: https://www.hhs.gov/about/leadership/jerome-adams/index.html

National Jewish Health - They have been recognized as the top pulmonary medical center in the United States for many years: https://www.nationaljewish.org/patients-visitors/patient-info/important-updates/infection-prevention-update-2019-novel-coronavirus

U.S. Small Business Administration

Oklahoma State Department of Health - COVID-19 Outbreak

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.

OU Medicine - COVID-19

The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma encourages anyone needing food assistance to visit rfbo.org/get-help or call (405) 972-1111

University of Oklahoma Coronavirus Resources

Norman Chamber of Commerce resources for businesses

NPR Special Series: The Coronavirus Crisis

Coronavirus around the world: The latest from the BBC

As a global pandemic takes hold, more people are turning to Facebook in search of news about the coronavirus.

But the traffic load on the social media platform is also testing its ability to crack down on a spike in virus-related misinformation. Users are being confronted with phony cures and conspiracy theories around the virus' origin. (Note: Facebook is a financial supporter of NPR.)

The $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package marks the largest rescue package in American history. President Trump announced Wednesday that it includes $300 billion in direct payments to individuals to alleviate at least a little of the financial pain caused by the deliberate near-standstill of the U.S. economy.

The $2.2 trillion coronavirus relief package marks the largest rescue package in American history. President Trump announced Wednesday that it includes $300 million in direct payments to individuals to alleviate at least a little of the financial pain caused by the deliberate near-standstill of the U.S. economy.

Banks are being ordered to allow people hurt financially in the coronavirus pandemic to skip mortgage payments. Some lenders are doing this for auto loans, credit cards and small business loans with no negative impact on people's credit scores.

If you're asking for this kind of help, NPR wants to hear from you.

We want to know how all of this is playing out. Are banks and other lenders working to help you? If you're a renter, is your landlord being flexible? We want to hear your experiences.

The $2 trillion emergency relief bill moving through Congress is designed to cushion the effects of the steep economic downturn caused by the pandemic — but provides little relief for immigrants.

The legislation, which provides one-time cash payments to low- and middle-income households, excludes immigrants in the country illegally as well as children who are U.S. citizens but have at least one parent who is undocumented.

Among the people affected by the downturn on Wall Street are some alleged victims of sexual abuse by Catholic priests.

The Diocese of Erie in northwestern Pennsylvania, identified in 2018 by the state attorney general as one of the places where clergy abuse had been especially egregious, has announced that it is suspending the processing of victim claims in response to what it calls the "economic turmoil" brought about by the coronavirus.

Updated 9:31 p.m. ET Thursday

The U.S. now has more coronavirus cases than any other country in the world, surpassing China's total and highlighting how rapidly the virus can move through a population.

The U.S. logged more than 83,000 cases as of 8 p.m. ET Thursday, while China reported more than 81,00 infections, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

With mass closings of theaters and museums, cancellations or postponements of exhibitions, concerts, dance performances and more, the arts industry is in "economic freefall" due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the advocacy group Americans For The Arts.

Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee looks at a graph of the latest coronavirus cases for his state and sees reason for hope. The line is still rising, but not as steeply as before.

"It is a glimmer of hope," he says. "It's suggestive that some of the things we are doing together is having some modest improvement."

But for every note of optimism, the governor adds twice as much caution.

Heading into Wednesday evening, Kosovo had already been tangled in tumult.

Iran is dealing with one of the worst outbreaks of the coronavirus in the world, with a death toll surpassing 2,200 people. But getting help into the country is hindered both by a truculent Iranian leadership and strong U.S. sanctions.

Post updated 8:15 a.m. March 27, to reflect that the abstract in PubMed has been marked retracted.

When asked why the United States didn't import coronavirus tests when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ran into difficulty developing its own, government officials have frequently questioned the quality of the foreign-made alternatives.

But NPR has learned that the key study they point to was retracted just days after it was published online in early March.

Two U.S. officials tell NPR that the Pentagon is expected to send 1,500 troops to the nation's borders with Canada and Mexico to assist Customs and Border Protection operations as the coronavirus death toll tops 1,100 in the United States.

On weekday evenings, sisters Lesley Laine and Lisa Ingle stage online happy hours from the Southern California home they share. It's something they've been enjoying with local and faraway friends during this period of social distancing and self-isolation. And on a recent evening, I shared a toast with them.

A political twist in Israel may help the embattled prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, stay in power.

After three inconclusive elections, the right wing Netanyahu and his centrist rival Benny Gantz are reportedly close to a deal to rotate as prime minister, with Netanyahu taking the first turn.

Italy has one of the world's oldest populations and its high COVID-19 death toll is mostly among the elderly with preexisting illnesses. But younger, healthy Italians have also become very sick after catching the new coronavirus.

Fausto Russo is a 38-year-old fitness trainer. He has been hospitalized with COVID-19 in Latina, south of Rome, for over two weeks. On Wednesday, he spoke to NPR and other international news media by video.

Stress and anxiety go hand-in-hand with the bad news about COVID-19 from around the world. Hearing constant reports about the illness and death caused by coronavirus can be hard to take. At a news conference today, the World Health Organization shared general tips for self-care and discussed why the mental health needs of the old and the young deserve special attention.

For starters, everyone needs to look after one's own basic needs to stay mentally healthy in a stressful time.

When our bodies are invaded by a virus, our immune systems make particular proteins called antibodies to help fight off infection.

Scientists working to quell the COVID-19 pandemic think it will be possible to figure out which antibodies are most potent in quashing a coronavirus infection, and then make vast quantities of identical copies of these proteins synthetically.

"We are at war with a virus that threatens to tear us apart," World Health Organization Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told world leaders Thursday, in a special virtual summit on the COVID-19 pandemic.

The deadly coronavirus, Tedros said, "is the defining health crisis of our time."

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