COVID-19: Resources | KGOU
KGOU

COVID-19: Resources

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

The White House sought to show that it's in control of the sprawling coronavirus crisis on Friday even as it acknowledged enduring shortfalls in key supplies.

Administration officials also said they're imposing new controls on travel and restricting passage through the northern border with Canada and the southern border with Mexico following agreements with those governments.

Here were some key points from the latest briefing.

Too few tests

Updated at 5:52 p.m. ET

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 913 points, leaving the index 2.8% lower than when President Trump took office. Friday's drop culminated a staggering week of losses as the coronavirus impact took an economic toll.

The Dow closed down nearly 4.6% Friday, and the S&P 500 index fell 4.3%. The Nasdaq dropped nearly 3.8%.

Updated Fri., April 17 at 8:03 a.m.


Ongoing event cancellations and business closures in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic have thrust artists, music companies and behind-the-scenes entertainment workers into an unprecedented state of financial uncertainty.

Updated Monday, Mar. 30 at 1:37 p.m.

A cruise ship arriving from New Zealand that docked in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, where passengers were allowed to disembark, was later found to have had four people aboard who were infected with the novel coronavirus, according to local media reports.

Across Washington's health care system, as the caseload of coronavirus patients grows, masks and other personal protective equipment are in short supply — and nurses are resorting to workarounds to try to stay safe.

Wendy Shaw, a charge nurse for an emergency room in Seattle, says her hospital and others have locked up critical equipment like masks and respirators to ensure they don't run out.

Cities across the U.S. are clamping down on large gatherings, and the CDC is recommending no more than 10 to a meeting — leading to disappointment for a lot of brides and grooms.

Thu Nguyen and Allen Gross stopped at the county courthouse in San Antonio on Monday to pick up their marriage license. I caught up with them right afterward and — given the current pandemic — stood as far away as my microphone would allow. They did get the license, but the moment isn't as happy as it could be.

Normally, right now, much of this country would be consumed by March Madness.

Aside from the financial assistance the Trump administration and Congress are considering for individuals, small business and corporations, the federal government itself could be the beneficiary of a huge injection of money if lawmakers and the White House agree to it.

Pharmacy staff who prepare IV drugs inside hospitals are the latest health care workers decrying a shortage of masks as they scramble to prepare medicines for patients with diagnoses ranging from cancer to COVID-19.

Gun and ammunition sales often spike during a crisis. That's exactly what's been happening now with the cornonavirus threat. Many gun buyers say they want to be ready with protection if there's panic.

Just a few miles from the Los Angles Airport, a group of people, including families with children playing video games, lined up outside LAX Ammo in Inglewood. A store employee checks IDs and tells potential customers what caliber ammunition is in stock. Answering questions, he tells the crowd he has .45 caliber and .38 Special.

U.S. and Mexican officials say that the two countries are working on an agreement to halt nonessential travel across their shared border while keeping vital trade links open as part of an effort to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, in a tweet on Thursday referring to the disease caused by the virus, said he was working closely with his Mexican counterpart, Secretary of Foreign Affairs Marcelo Ebrard, "on travel restrictions that balance protecting our citizens from further transmission of #COVID19."

Gov. Gavin Newsom has ordered California's 40 million residents to stay at home indefinitely in the widest-ranging directive so far of any state as it grapples with a growing novel coronavirus epidemic that has killed 150 people nationwide.

The order late Thursday called on people to remain in their homes with exceptions only for essential travel. The move follows similar restrictions issued earlier this week for the San Francisco Bay Area.

Senate Republicans unveiled a 247-page proposed coronavirus relief bill Thursday evening.

The third legislative package to deal with the outbreak, the bill would provide direct cash payments help for small businesses and more resources for testing.

The bill still has to be negotiated with Senate Democrats, which is expected Friday. Some Senate Republicans are also pushing for changes.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom expects about 56% of the state's population – more than 22 million Californians – to be infected with the coronavirus over an eight-week period.

The estimate was in a letter Newsom sent to President Trump, dated Wednesday, asking Trump to deploy the naval hospital ship Mercy to the waters off of Los Angeles through the beginning of September.

Yes, it's a pandemic.

Yes, it's got us all freaked out.

And yes, it's our civic duty to remain at least 6 feet away from each other throughout this crisis.

But singles looking to mingle still have needs.

Shawnee Public Schools custodian Lavonne Harris wipes down a door knob at the district’s central office.
Robby Korth / StateImpact Oklahoma

Lysol is Lavonne Harris’ most powerful weapon against pandemic.

The custodian for Shawnee Public Schools is wielding the disinfectant inside her district’s school board room to fight off the novel coronavirus that’s infected hundreds of thousands worldwide.

This stuff will “kill all the germs,” she says.

As Americans shift their lives indoors and away from large public gatherings, people across the U.S. are grappling with basic questions about life, work and social distancing in the age of COVID-19.

Schools have shut down or pivoted to online learning, restaurants have halted dine-in services, and businesses across the nation have altered their work hours or shuttered completely. NPR checked in this week, with residents of three U.S. cities that have been among the first to face high numbers of cases and restrictions related to the outbreak.

Hundreds of Israelis were startled Wednesday by an unsolicited text message.

"Hello. According to an epidemiological investigation," it began, addressing each recipient by name. "You were near someone sick with the coronavirus. You must immediately isolate at home [14 days] to protect your relatives and the public. ... This information will be used only for this purpose and will be erased when no longer needed. Sincerely, public health services."

Brazil's famed Christ the Redeemer statue was lit up with the flags of countries that have reported positive coronavirus tests, as cases of the virus spread around the world.

The giant statue of Jesus Christ, which stands nearly 100 feet tall and overlooks the city of Rio de Janeiro, also showed images of the continents afflicted. Images of the words "pray together" in many languages were also projected onto the statue on Wednesday.

Pages