COVID-19: Resources | KGOU
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COVID-19: Resources

Credit NIAID-RML

Resources and links to information about the novel coronavirus COVID-19

Oklahoma State Department of Health's Vaccination Portal: https://vaccinate.oklahoma.gov

Fact vs. Rumor: FEMA's Coronavirus Rumor Control

World Health Organization (WHO) - COVID-19 Outbreak

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Coronavirus

CDC Guidance for Businesses and Employers

National Institutes for Health (NIH) (NIAID) - Coronaviruses

Johns Hopkins University  Global case tracker, daily reports, FAQs with experts, and more

National Jewish Health pulmonary medical center

U.S. Small Business Administration

Oklahoma Resources:

Oklahoma State Department of Health's Vaccination Portal: https://vaccinate.oklahoma.gov

Oklahoma State Department of Health - Color-coded COVID-19 Alert System (Map)

Oklahoma State Department of Health - COVID-19 Outbreak

Integris Health symptom checker

Oklahoma City/County Health Dept. Hotline for the Uninsured or those without a primacy care physician:  (405) 425-4489

Data Source: Acute Disease Service, Oklahoma State Department of Health.

OU Medicine - COVID-19

The Regional Food Bank of Oklahoma encourages anyone needing food assistance to visit rfbo.org/get-help or call (405) 972-1111

University of Oklahoma Coronavirus Resources

Norman Chamber of Commerce resources for businesses

Latest News:

NPR Special Series: The Coronavirus Crisis

Coronavirus around the world: The latest from the BBC

APM Research Lab: COVID-19 Deaths by Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.

Vaccines Reach Nearly All Oklahoma Long-Term Care Facilities

Feb 5, 2021
ennifer Ferguson, a resident at Santa Fe Place in Moore, smiles as a nurse from Walgreens prepares to give her a COVID-19 vaccine.
Whitney Bryen / Oklahoma Watch

Nearly seven weeks after COVID-19 vaccines reached Oklahoma nursing homes, first doses have been delivered to residents and staff at nearly every long-term care facility in the state.

Rev. Derrick Scobey, Ebenezer Baptist Church Senior Pastor, helped to organize the event in an effort to encourage more African Americans in Oklahoma City to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

Oklahoma County will soon be home to a large-scale coronavirus vaccine site known as a mega-POD.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET

Hiring resumed just tepidly last month after a slump in December, as the labor market faces a long climb to recover the millions of jobs lost during the pandemic.

U.S. employers added 49,000 jobs in January, after a revised drop of 227,000 the month before. Unemployment fell to 6.3%, from 6.7% in December, as hundreds of thousands of people left the workforce.

Industries that saw notable job gains in January include business and professional services and finance, but bars and restaurants continued to lose jobs.

Georgia Washington, 79, can't drive. Whenever she needs to go somewhere, she asks her daughter or her friends to pick her up.

She has lived in the northern part of Baton Rouge, a predominantly Black area of Louisiana's capital, since 1973. There aren't many resources there, including medical facilities. So when Washington fell ill with COVID-19 last March, she had to get a ride 20 minutes south to get medical attention.

It had been months since Tremellia Hobbs had an excuse to bring out the pompoms. Before the pandemic, they were a crowd favorite during movie nights and bingo tournaments that Hobbs organized as activities director at the nursing home.

Steve Larimore was hoping to triple the size of his garden this year.

Once the seed catalog arrived at his home near Bend, Ore., Larimore excitedly got his order together. He then went online and began adding the different seed varieties to his cart, only to discover about a third of the items he wanted were unavailable.

Tomatoes? Sold out. Kale? Gone. Sweet corn? Nope.

"I was pretty discouraged," he says. "There were some things that I've grown before that I really like and I wanted to grow again and they didn't have those."

A third coronavirus vaccine candidate has requested emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration. Johnson & Johnson submitted its application Thursday for the company's single-dose inoculation.

Republican lawmakers in Wisconsin approved a joint resolution Thursday overriding Gov. Tony Evers' most recent COVID-19 state of emergency, abolishing a state-wide mask mandate. In response, Evers declared a new state of emergency. Effective immediately, Wisconsinites must again wear masks in public places.

Less than three weeks into the new Biden administration, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the infectious disease expert who has headed up the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases since 1984, is encouraged by the new president's approach to the COVID-19 pandemic.

"It was very clear what President Biden wanted ... and that is that science was going to rule," Fauci says. "That we were going to base whatever we do, our recommendations or guidelines ... on sound scientific evidence and sound scientific data."

A confirmed COVID-19 case at a quarantine hotel in Melbourne, Australia, is forcing organizers of a major tennis tournament to mandate that more than 500 players and their staffs "be tested and isolate until they receive a negative test result" just days before play is set to begin.

Athletes prepping for the Australian Open, the year's first Grand Slam tournament and scheduled for Feb. 8 – 21, will not be permitted to leave their rooms until they test negative for the coronavirus.

With millions of older Americans eligible for COVID-19 vaccines and limited supplies, many continue to describe a frantic and frustrating search to secure a shot, beset by uncertainty and difficulty.

The efforts to vaccinate people who are 65 and older have strained under the enormous demand that has overwhelmed cumbersome, inconsistent scheduling systems.

Updated at 5:33 p.m. ET

Like residents around the country, millions of Floridians are anxious to get the COVID-19 vaccine, but the process of signing up for the shots has been confusing. Until recently, the process was different in each of the state's 67 counties.

Rev. Derrick Scobey, Ebenezer Baptist Church Senior Pastor, helped to organize the event in an effort to encourage more African Americans in Oklahoma City to receive the vaccine.
Sue Ogrocki / AP

For the first time in months, coronavirus cases are down in Oklahoma and medical experts are cautiously optimistic the trend will continue.

It's time to up your mask game.

With new, more contagious strains of the coronavirus spreading in the U.S., and transmission levels still very high in many places, some public health experts recommend that Americans upgrade from the basic cloth masks that many have been wearing during the pandemic.

"A cloth mask might be 50% effective at blocking viruses and aerosols," says Linsey Marr, a researcher at Virginia Tech who studies airborne virus transmission. "We're at the point now ... that we need better than 50%."

Counting the dead is one of the first, somber steps in reckoning with an event of enormous tragic scope, be that war, natural disaster or a pandemic.

This dark but necessary arithmetic has become all too routine during the COVID-19 outbreak.

January was the deadliest month so far in the U.S.; the virus killed more than 95,458 Americans.

Unable to tame a third wave of coronavirus infections after a month-long state of emergency, Japan announced Tuesday it is extending the emergency for another month. The move comes despite a mounting toll on the economy and the threat of bumping up against the country's Summer Olympics preparations.

OK. So what in the heck is going on with all these variants? Why is everyone so worried? And how do they work?

To answer these questions, let's go back in time to January 2020, when we were all blissfully going about our lives, eating in restaurants, cramming into elevators at work and dancing at house parties on the weekends.

Back then, the coronavirus looked a bit like this (well, not really, but if it was made of Legos, it would look like this).

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

Russia's Sputnik V vaccine is 92% effective in protecting people from developing COVID-19 symptoms, according to a study published in The Lancet on Tuesday.

The study follows a Phase 3 trial in Moscow hospitals and clinics that included nearly 22,000 participants age 18 and older.

The vaccine, known as Gam-COVID-Vac, "was well tolerated in a large cohort," the researchers said. It was administered in two doses, 21 days apart.

As the virus that causes COVID-19 continues its global attack, it has done what scientists predicted it would do — it has given rise to new, slightly different strains. How significant some of those strains will be to the pandemic is now under intense study. Meanwhile, demand for the currently available vaccines is outstripping the early supply, and some scientists have sparked controversy by suggesting holding off on booster shots until more people have had their initial shots.

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