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Royal Timing: Harry And Meghan's Baby News Distracts From Brexit

TOPSHOT - Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex wave from the Ascot Landau Carriage during their carriage procession on Castle Hill outside Windsor Castle in Windsor, on May 19, 2018 after their wedding ceremony.
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TOPSHOT - Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and his wife Meghan, Duchess of Sussex wave from the Ascot Landau Carriage during their carriage procession on Castle Hill outside Windsor Castle in Windsor, on May 19, 2018 after their wedding ceremony.

For those of you who haven’t been keeping up with the news from across the pond, The Duke and Duchess of Sussex are expecting a baby.

Who?

These people.

— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) October 15, 2018

The New York Times’ Caity Weaver attended the (second) Royal Wedding, which you’ll recall, took place this May.

She wrote this, about what it was like to be in the crowd at their wedding.

In less than a year — in fewer than six hours, if you peg it to live TV coverage — Ms. Markle had gone from essentially unknown to one of the most famous people on the planet. More than 100,000 people had traveled to Windsor to be in the vicinity of an invitation-only event of which she was the star; just shy of two billion were estimated to watch it on TV. She was at that precise moment in thoughts of, very conservatively, tens of millions of human beings. She and Prince Harry came bounding down the Long Walk. Everyone clambered for a second of eye contact, but their faces flew by so suddenly even a second was impossible to claim.

And then, much more quickly than it began, it was over. The police could eat ice cream again, and did. A trio of elderly Brits speculated about whether the couple would have sex before that evening’s private reception. The crowd, which, moments before, had sung a proud pledge to the monarch, dropped their plastic flags on the ground and abandoned them. The day was too fine to waste on ceremony.

It has not gone, shall we say, unnoticed, that Meghan Markle is due in spring of 2019; Brexit is supposed to happen on March 29.

Is the royal family still relevant? Do we focus on celebrity news to distract from political strife?

GUESTS

Kristen Meinzer, Director of nonfiction programming, Panoply; Co-host of the podcast When Meghan Met Harry (2017-2018); @kristenmeinzer

For more, visit https://the1a.org.

© 2018 WAMU 88.5 – American University Radio.

Copyright 2018 WAMU 88.5

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