Impeachment | KGOU
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Impeachment

Donald J. Trump becomes just the third U.S. President to be impeached. We've gathered news on the U.S. House Articles of Impeachment and coverage of the trial in the U.S. Senate, including video of the proceedings.

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET

The impeachment inquiry enters a new open phase with a House vote on a resolution formalizing the impeachment inquiry. The measure drafted by House Democrats lays out the ground rules for public hearings, provides procedures for the president and his counsel to respond to evidence and sets out the process for considering articles of impeachment in the Judiciary Committee and the full House.

Updated 3:08 p.m. ET

President Trump lashed out about the House impeachment inquiry in a tweet Tuesday morning, calling it "a lynching," a choice of words that drew sharp rebukes from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

In his post, Trump wrote, "So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights. All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here - a lynching. But we will WIN!"

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

In this episode of Capitol Insider, KGOU's Dick Pryor interviews U.S. Rep. Kendra Horn about the possible impeachment of President Donald Trump. Horn is one of a few House Democrats who has not backed the impeachment inquiry launched Sept. 24. 

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

 

Kendra Horn represents Oklahoma’s fifth congressional district, and she is one of a small group of Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives who does not support the impeachment inquiry into President Trump’s relations with Ukraine.

The topic of impeachment is back and hotter than ever in Washington. But is it back by popular demand? Will the issue simmer into the fall, or will the heat dissipate in the days ahead?

More Democrats than ever — a majority — now favor opening formal proceedings to remove President Trump from office. More joined the chorus over the weekend after reports suggested Trump pressured an ally to support a certain line of attack on Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.

But the fever for impeachment has yet to be felt by much of the public at large.

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