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Up First briefing: Gaza has few good Hamas replacements; Las Vegas hospitality strike

Palestinians mourn relatives killed in the Israeli bombardment of the Gaza Strip in front of the morgue in Deir al-Balah on Monday.
Hatem Moussa
/
AP
Palestinians mourn relatives killed in the Israeli bombardment of the Gaza Strip in front of the morgue in Deir al-Balah on Monday.

Good morning. You're reading the Up First newsletter. Subscribe here to get it delivered to your inbox, and listen to the Up First podcast for all the news you need to start your day.

Today's top stories

Tomorrow marks one month since Hamas militants attacked southern Israeli communities, killing more than 1,400 people and taking more than 200 hostages. Since then, Israeli forces have launched an intense military offensive from the ground and air. Nearly 10,000 people have been killed in Gaza, according to the Ministry of Health. Most of them are women and children. Here's where the conflict in the Middle East stands.

  • Israel says it will never again let Hamas control Gaza. On Up First, NPR's Greg Myre says even if Israel successfully drives Hamas out, there aren't many good candidates to replace the group.
  • Tens of thousands of protesters took to the streets in Washington, D.C., this weekend for one of the biggest pro-Palestinian protests in the U.S. since the war began. See photos from Saturday's rally here.


Check out npr.org/mideastupdates for more coverage, differing views and analysis of this conflict.

Ukraine's top military commander angered the country's president, Volodymyr Zelenskyy, after publishing an essay in The Economist saying Ukraine's counteroffensive against Russia has reached a stalemate. President Zelenskyy has been pitching a message of hope and strength to his people and allies.

  • Ukrainians are "tired and anxious" after more than 600 days of war, NPR's Joanna Kakissis reports on Morning Edition from Kyiv. They're worried Western support is waning and understand their country is losing its best soldiers. Still, Kakissis says they don't want to trade territory for a peace deal with Russia. 


Former President Donald Trump is set to testify later today in his family's New York civil fraud trial. A judge ruled previously that Trump and his three oldest children were liable for "persistent and repeated fraud." This current trial looks at six more conspiracy and fraud causes of action. If found liable, Trump and his family face up to $250 million in penalties and a ban from doing business in New York.

  • Trump's biggest defense is what he calls a "worthless" clause in his statements of financial condition, NPR's Andrea Bernstein says. He's accused of lying about his property values. The former president argues that whatever he claimed doesn't matter because banks should have checked his work.


Tens of thousands of hospitality workers in Las Vegas could go on strike this Friday if their union is unable to reach a deal for a new contract with casinos, hotels and restaurants in the area. It's poised to be the largest hospitality worker strike in U.S. history and could disrupt the Formula 1 Las Vegas Grand Prix race later this month.

Life advice

Experts say anyone can get seasonal affective disorder, though geography and gender may make people more susceptible.
Leon Neal / Getty Images
/
Getty Images
Experts say anyone can get seasonal affective disorder, though geography and gender may make people more susceptible.

Winter is coming. And while there's lots to look forward to with the advent of cold weather, people with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) may struggle this time of year. About 5% of Americans are affected by SAD. Doctors say reduced light exposure and sleep cycle disruptions may trigger the disorder. Read about how to spot the symptoms and learn ways to cope with them.

  • Try a SAD lamp to get more light and prioritize getting as much natural light as possible.
  • Stop eating three hours before you plan on sleeping so your body knows it's time to rest.
  • Exercise during the day to cue your body to wake up. 
  • Be proactive about reducing stress. See a therapist, consider medication if you need it and make plans to celebrate small joys.

Today's listen

Picket signs during the Hollywood strike pointed to possible scenarios.
Mandalit del Barco / NPR
/
NPR
Picket signs during the Hollywood strike pointed to possible scenarios.

Hollywood writers won a new contract with major studios after a monthslong strike. Actors are still not working. How will the dual work stoppages be memorialized on screens big and small?

Hollywood writers, actors, stunt performers, dancers and voice-over actors tell NPR how they'd present their stories on TV and film. Read their interviews here.

3 things to know before you go

Roland Griffiths' research showed how psychedelics can alleviate depression in people with terminal diseases.
/ Andre Chung/The Washington Post via Getty Images
/
Andre Chung/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Roland Griffiths' research showed how psychedelics can alleviate depression in people with terminal diseases.

  1. Scientist Roland Griffiths dedicated the later part of his career to researching how psychedelics can help cancer patients with depression. He recently died after his own cancer battle. NPR's Rachel Martin reflects on her conversation with him in April.
  2. A new foundation in Matthew Perry's name was launched to help people with drug addiction. The foundation says it reflects the late actor's "enduring commitment" to helping people struggling with the disease. 
  3. Tyson is recalling roughly 30,000 pounds of dinosaur-shaped chicken nuggets after consumers reported finding metal pieces inside. 

This newsletter was edited by Olivia Hampton.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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